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Old 06-16-2010   #16 (permalink)
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Talking Foods ~ Una Rosa Por Cualquier Otro Nombre

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Originally Posted by Montego View Post
So where the tacos dorados rolled? I ask becasue in Jalisco flautas resemble rolled tacos. While tacos dorados are made essentially the same (fried) just not rolled and not sitting in sauce like flautas.
In Tampa (I think other places where I have ordered them too) Flautas are tightly rolled corn tortillas with a small amount of finely minced filling ~ generally chicken, pork, or fish ~ which are then deep fried and served plain. You can put your own sauce on them, if you want. These are identical to "Tacos Dorados" that we found in Morelia, Patzcuaro, Uruapan & Zihuatanejo.

Another food difference that we found ~ "quesadillas" ~ which here are normally two flat tortillas (usually flour) with something melted/sandwiched in-between are called "sinchronizadas" in this part of Mexico. Their "quesadillas" are what we would call "empanadas." Mike had seen an order of "empanadas" (to us!) go out to a table and wanted to order some, but we couldn't find them on the menu, and explaining what we were looking for in Spanish was difficult. I suggested that he order the quesadillas instead..... HAH!! He got his empanadas!!

Also ~ we encountered all different types of micheladas. We were only familiar with the ones served up in Playa and Cozumel ~ with lime juice, Maggi (or "Salsa Ingles" - Worcestershire) and hot sauce, over ice in a glass with a salted rim ~ which you pour the beer of your choice over. In this area, those are referred to as a michelada a la Cubana. If you just order a michelada, you'll get lime juice on ice in a glass with a salted rim ~ no other seasonings. If you want a michelada made with Clamato ~ you'll need to order a "Lesbiana."

Last edited by JoanieBlon; 06-17-2010 at 12:38 PM..
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Old 06-16-2010   #17 (permalink)
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Thumbs up Patzcuaro ~ La Casa Encantada

Mike and I had a very pleasant drive with Francisco from Morelia to Patzcuaro. The landscape between the two cities is basically open meadows and farmland dotted with trees and volcanic rocks. Many of the mountains in the area are dormant or extinct volcanoes.
The entrance road up into Patzcuaro is lined with huge old trees which give you a feeling that you are about to experience something VERY SPECIAL. How true!

When we entered the city proper, we were mesmerized by the buildings there. You feel as if you’ve stepped back 200 years in time! More about Patzcuaro later…..

Mike and I stayed at La Casa Encantada while we were in Patzcuaro. It looked lovely online and is HIGHLY rated on Trip Advisor. Now that we’ve stayed there, I can’t imagine staying anywhere else in Patzcuaro! It’s conveniently located just around the corner from La Plaza Grande, on a fairly quiet street.

Our experience was 1st Class from my initial email contact requesting reservations all the way to us checking out. I cannot say enough about Cynthia, one of the owners, who went out of her way to promptly answer any and all questions and to make our visit to Patzcuaro and the surrounding area one to remember. There is bi-lingual staff available each day until about 8pm to help with plans or offer advice.

Mike and I stayed in the Gran Sala Suite, which is located off the first courtyard in the front of the building, facing Dr. Coss Street. This suite has two COMFORTABLE king beds, two fireplaces, gas heat, a casual sitting area, a dining table with four chairs, a kitchen with a small fridge, gas burner stovetop, bottled water, dining service, bottled water, etc., and a bathroom that was designed so that each sleeping area could enter and use the bathroom with complete privacy.

Because it was off-season (May) and we stayed 4 nights, we were able to get a great rate for the suite ~ just a tiny bit more than US $100 per night! The price included a full bottle of wine on arrival and a hot breakfast with fruit, juice, coffee, tea, breads, pastries, etc., each morning. The breakfast was served up in the lovely original kitchen of the house.

Many of the unoccupied rooms were left open in the morning to air out, and I can say that I would be happy in ANY of them, although it WAS nice to have such roomy accommodations! (and ESPECIALLY at SUCH a GREAT price!!)

Here are some extensive photos of the WONDERFUL La Casa Encantada.

La Casa Encantada from Dr. Coss street. Our suite was to the left of the entrance. The two windows looked out from our main room.




The first courtyard looking towards the kitchen.



Some of the EXTENSIVE folk art on the property. I have NEVER seen SO MUCH original folk art in any hotel or B&B! At times I wondered if the owners purchased La Casa Encantada so they would have a place to display their folk art collection!!



The first courtyard looking from the kitchen to the entrance gate.



Beautiful calla lilies growing in the courtyard. All the flowers on the property were breathtaking.



The second courtyard.



Grand Sala entry area, showing the seating area by the fireplace.



Seating area, fireplace, and shelves filled with folk art.



The windows looking out to the street. These had wood shutters inside that could be closed and locked at night.



View into the first courtyard from inside the Gran Sala Suite.



The kitchen area, which had a hand-made copper sink, at the end of the main room.



Dining table and king bed in the main room. Note the intricate hand-painted ceiling.



Ceiling detail.



Main room bed and doorways into the private bedroom and the bathroom.



Looking into the bedroom and bathroom from the dining area.



The private bedroom ~ which had its own corner fireplace.





Looking from the bedroom out into the dining area.



Views of the bathroom which was finished with hand-painted Mexican tile.





The main kitchen area where breakfast was prepared. There was fruit, tea and coffee available at all hours. The dining area of the kitchen had a computer for the use of guests ~ and from which I did my “live from Patzcuaro” trip reports. WiFi was also available. The dining area had a fireplace as well as additional heating for the chilly winter months. Even in May, the fireplace in the dining area was welcome during breakfast!



Just a TINY sample of all the fantastic art at La Casa Encantada.
This was a lamp in our bedroom.



A painted religious icon.



Carved furniture and art in the first courtyard.



I collect catrinas, and would have LOVED to take these fine examples home with me!





I just cannot adequately convey what a marvelous place La Casa Encantada is! I DID NOT want to leave! I hope that what I’ve written along with the photos will convince you that a trip to Patzcuaro is a MUST and that La Casa Encantada in THE place to stay!
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Old 06-16-2010   #18 (permalink)
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Joanie, Wow! you really know how to plan an interesting trip.
I love the old colonial parts of Mexico.....just beautiful.
Thank you so much for this report.
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Old 06-17-2010   #19 (permalink)
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Wow - this place (along with your first stop) is so interesting! What a neat place to visit and thank you for sharing it with all of us

...can't wait for more!!
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Old 06-17-2010   #20 (permalink)
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Angry There Are NO Bullets Flying in Patzcuaro!

I received a letter from Cynthia, who, along with her partner Victoria, owns La Casa Encantada. I had written her to let her know that I had posted a review of La Casa Encantada with photos on another Mexico travel forum, if she wanted to take a look at it, and that I planned to post a similar review on Trip Advisor soon.

I am quite aware that there has been VERY negative press as well as TV news features regarding travel in Mexico. Articles would lead you to believe that your life is in danger if you set foot on Mexican soil!
Mike and I felt PERFECTLY AT EASE in ALL of the cities, towns, and villages that we visited in Michoacán and Guerrera! We walked everywhere, and never once felt danger of ANY sort. People were incredibly friendly and went out of their way to be helpful. I cannot say the same thing for places here in the USA where we have visited.

The guy who delivers mail at my office asked me if I had a nice vacation. He was aware that I had been gone for awhile, but he didn't know where. I told him that Mike & I had a FABULOUS time in Mexico! The FIRST words out of his mouth were, "Oh! It's REALLY dangerous there! You have to be REALLY careful about traveling in that country." I proceeded to set him straight on our experiences and let him know that the press has GREATLY over-exaggerated the perceived "dangers" of visiting Mexico...

I'd like to interject here that there are CONSTANT crime problems in the Tampa Bay area. Recently a police officer was gunned down, some guy killed (randomly) a high school girl, several students at the University of Tampa were murdered walking along the street at night, and a high school student walking home was shot in the back and died. If you ever watch the TV program "Cops," you know that Tampa is featured quite regularly. Our crime statistics for murder, rape, aggravated assult, etc., are all above the national average. I hear sirens ALL the time here. Do you ever read warnings in your local papers, or on government websites advising that you NOT travel to or vacation in Tampa? Probably not..... I bet you NEVER see features on your local TV news warning about the dangers of going to Tampa ~ St. Petersburg or Clearwater.

Negative press is affecting the lives of many Mexican families who live in areas dependant on tourism for their living. Read what Cynthia has to say about the drastic drop in tourism in Patzcuaro due to the hysteria over "safety." VERY SAD!

Quote:
......Thank you so much for taking the time to visit Patzcuaro, walk our streets and then post such an incredibly wonderful and extensive website.

Are you a photographer professionally?

Would you mind if we used some of your photos on our website?

FYI: As our English reservation person, daily I am answering emails from American guests that are sadly mostly canceling as a result of reading "disturbingly incorrect" information in their local and national papers/TV about our area and Mexico in general.

I literally am getting emails telling me guests need to cancel because of the "bullets flying in Patzcuaro"....as you know there are no bullets flying here.

As of this week I received an email from a previous American guest that cancelled and sent their prayers to us and offered Victoria and I to stay with them in Texas if we were no longer safe here in Patzcuaro. We had only met these guests once (last summer) so it goes to show you the incredible kindness and generosity of individual Americans as well as how sadly Americans are currently being misinformed and terrified by their own news media about travel to their Southern neighbors.

We have a family of 8 staff dependent on their wages and a large extended group of people dependent on them so we are very happy to say all our staff are employed with their health benefits intact.
Sadly many other hotel and local businesses have had to let go of employees due to the large decrease in Americans traveling to Mexico.

The current "yellow journalism" in the U.S. is hurting our area far worse than any drug problems.

I am sharing this with you Joan because although we at La Casa Encantada will obviously benefit directly from your incredibly kind and extensive positive posting of our B&B in Patzcuaro (again we can not thank you enough!!)

I want you to know that your energies and kindness will go a long way in also helping others here in Patzcuaro. Others you probably will never meet.

We at La Casa Encantada will ensure that any and all guests that might visit us will be provided with the best of service and accommodations as well as we will ensure we refer our visiting guests to frequent and enjoy as many of our local services as possible.

We thank you and know your referral will go a long way and positively touch many.
I'm sure most of you who travel to Playa, Tulum, Merida and the Mexican Riveiera already know this, BUT......

DO NOT BE AFRAID TO TRAVEL TO MEXICO!!
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Old 06-17-2010   #21 (permalink)
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Well said...I, too, hear that all the time and it really makes me CRAZZZZY! But if that's what they read & hear - you know how "the press is always right"...WRONG!
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Old 06-17-2010   #22 (permalink)
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I am really enjoying your trip report, Joanie!! Absolutely loved the carved furniture pieces. Thanks for taking the time to share your vacation with us.


I love, love LOVE this.....


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Old 06-17-2010   #23 (permalink)
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I am really enjoying your trip report, Joanie!! Absolutely loved the carved furniture pieces. Thanks for taking the time to share your vacation with us.


I love, love LOVE this.....


I was TOTALLY BLOWN AWAY by that BEAUTIFUL ceiling!
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Old 06-17-2010   #24 (permalink)
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That hotel is breathtaking!


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Also ~ we encountered all different types of micheladas. We were only familiar with the ones served up in Playa and Cozumel ~ with lime juice, Maggi (or "Salsa Ingles" - Worcestershire) and hot sauce, over ice in a glass with a salted rim ~ which you pour the beer of your choice over. In this area, those are referred to as a michelada a la Cubana. If you just order a michelada, you'll get lime juice on ice in a glass with a salted rim ~ no other seasonings. If you want a michelada made with Clamato ~ you'll need to order a "Lesbiana."

The above is SO funny.
I adore micheladas, and I have tried to order a michelada Cubano (my favourite) in Playa and Cabo- they looked at like I have two heads.
Then in Sayulita this past February I ordered just a regular michelada- and got one with clamato, which I didn't want. Regional differences!

I think Maggi Sauce is basically MSG, just a flavour enhancer....I have both in my fridge, and it is not the same taste at all as Worchestershire. Usually they put both in a michelada, along with Tabasco.


Guerrero is a dangerous state compared to the rest of Mexico, it has had a lot of narcoviolence for years now. It is the one state along with Sinaloa that the advisories specifically name other than the border states and cities.
Being from a city of 300,000 where murders average only 5 or 6 a year, I won't lie, the lawlessness and number of murders DOES concern us. But we still feel comfortable travelling there too, after all, tourists are not at risk or targeted.

I think we might be going to Zihua in early August in fact, and I can't wait to read your Zihua part of the report!
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Old 06-17-2010   #25 (permalink)
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Thumbs up Patzcuaro ~ Un Pueblo Magico!

We arrived in Patzcuaro about 5:00pm on Friday, May 14th. After getting settled in at La Casa Encantada, we decided to have a stroll around town and see if we could find an interesting place to have an evening meal.

Mike and I were both puzzled by some very loud explosions that went off every 5 to 10 minutes. They sounded like “crow cannons” which were used up in Connecticut to scare the birds out of the crops, so I assumed that’s what they were…..WRONG! We found out later from our wonderful guide, Jaime, that they were fireworks that were being set off in honor of a SAINT ~ for that saint’s day. Apparently there are a couple of guys in Patzcuaro who have selected patron saints and when their respective saint’s day approaches, they set off fireworks in his honor ~ with each guy trying to outdo the other guy!

The BOOMS! Continued until shortly after dark, but started up at 5:30am on Saturday morning!

As it turned out, we were VERY lucky to have shown up in Patzcuaro when we did, as the saint who was being honored was Saint Isadore, also known in Mexico as San Isidro ~ the patron saint of farmers, peasants and day laborers. We got to witness a WONDERFUL, colorful parade in his honor the following day. We had NO idea that we would be treated to this local tradition with many Tarascan people in their very best traditional costumes, decorated ox carts, a marching brass band, etc. I’ll post pictures of that parade tomorrow.

Here’s THE GUY who was the source of the BOOMS! Happily, on Sunday, after the Fiesta de San Isidro had passed, the BOOMS! stopped.



To me, Patzcuaro is a VERY SPECIAL, enchanting place. When you enter the city, you can imagine that you’ve gone back 200+ years in time. Of course, there are automobiles, electricity, and other modern conveniences, but the basic aura of the city is timeless. It exudes feelings of a simpler time when people spent time together and engaged in ages old occupations ~ farming, fishing, weaving, and hand-crafting items for use in every day life. I’ve NEVER seen any city that has a bulk SEED STORE located on their main plaza. Apparently it’s been there forever and ever, and has been run by the same man for generations. In Patzcuaro, you still see MANY Tarascan people in their traditional clothing out and about.

I just happened to think of something we heard while we were in Patzcuaro that DID remind us that we were living in “modern times” ~ the propane gas truck going up and down the streets with a LOUD loudspeaker doing the “dah-da-dah-da-da-DAH-------CHARGE!!!” ditty that you hear at sporting events. Forever after, when we hear than little melody, we’ll think of the propane gas vendor in Patzcuaro!

Here are a few photos of what Patzcuaro looks like…..I plan to post quite a few more tomorrow.

One of the colonnades that surround the Plaza Grande ~ with places to eat and drink, buy breads and pastries, ice cream, and other necessities of life. Many local people set up little spots to sell local handcrafted items as well.



One of the fountains on the Plaza Grande, where people gather just to visit and enjoy life. There is also a vivacious Plaza Chica several blocks away which is located next to the very large and fascinating El Mercado.



One of the interesting shops in Patzcuaro featuring articles from the local artensania villages.



Outdoor dining area adjacent to the Plaza Grande ~ showing one of the colonnades.



This ELOTE (roasted corn) vendor’s spot was next to La Surtidora, where Mike and I would relax and have a couple of beers ($16 pesos ~ although I generally ordered Don Julio reposado con sangrita ~ a BARGAIN at just $50 pesos) each evening, along with some snacks. The vendor would call “ELOTE” about every 20 seconds or so. Mike said he could hear her in his sleep. Her corn was very popular. We never did try any, thinking that we’d get some elote con crema y queso in Zihuatanejo, but the vendor wasn’t there when we looked. Next time!



Mike at “Our” table at La Surtidora. He doesn’t especially like having his picture taken….There was all sorts of interesting things to gawk at... .... singers, vendors, and people just out and about!



This photo, which was taken at one of the corners of the Plaza Grande, shows the typical architecture in Patzcuaro. All buildings must be painted white with dark red bases. The lettering must all be of the same style and painted red, black and white. All of the lanterns lining the streets are identical. BTW ~ see the plastic buckets? There were quite a few guys around the Plaza who were engaged in car washing. They did a bang up business, so I assume that the price was right.



A Tarascan woman carrying a pail of flowers ~ a very typical scene in Patzcuaro. There were quite a few ladies selling flowers, shawls, woven goods, herbal tea, and other items.



Patzcuaro is a place we WILL return to ~ hopefully over and over again. It’s truly Un Pueblo Magico! In fact, Mike liked it SO MUCH there, that he has suggested that we cancel our October trip to Italy and go there again instead!

Tomorrow ~ more about Patzcuaro…..

Last edited by JoanieBlon; 06-17-2010 at 01:48 PM..
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Old 06-17-2010   #26 (permalink)
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I want to live there!!!! WOW!!! Great pictures!
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Old 06-17-2010   #27 (permalink)
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I want to live there!!!! WOW!!! Great pictures!
I could live there!! We met a couple at La Casa Encantada (had breakfast with them several mornings) who were originally from Minnesota, but who had been living in Ajijic ~ an ex-pat community near Guadalajara. This was their FIRST trip to Patzcuaro, and they said they were seriously considering selling their home in Ajijic and settling in Patzcuaro instead!

Sort of made me wonder why anybody would just pack up and move to ONE place in Mexico before checking out what other cities have to offer....

BTW ~ Why don't you use your Continental "discount" ~ fly down to Morelia and go visit Patzcuaro?
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Old 06-17-2010   #28 (permalink)
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I was TOTALLY BLOWN AWAY by that BEAUTIFUL ceiling!
I bet!! Great way to add dimension and the lighting seals the deal. Very very nice!
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Old 06-18-2010   #29 (permalink)
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Touring the Artesania Villages Around Lake Patzcuaro

Inasmuch as I forgot to bring home a list of photo editing notes, I decided to continue my report in actual order by days, instead of posting more information and photos of Patzcuaro right now.

We hired Jaime Hernandez Balderas to be our guide for 2 days to take us to and through the villages surrounding Patzcuaro. We also went a bit away from the lake as well ~ visiting Santa Clara del Cobre with its many copper workshops and Capula ~ the town of the Catrinas.

Jaime was first recommended to me by a person who regularly posts on another Mexico travel forum. I also found out he is THE guide recommended by La Casa Encantada where we stayed in Patzcuaro.

The following information is from Jaime's online brochure:

Quote:
Jaime Hernández Balderas
Your Guide

Jaime owns and operates Animecha Tours in Pátzcuaro, Mich. México and works with individuals as well as with groups. Jaime is a native of Pátzcuaro and speaks fluent English. He is passionate about the history, legends, and traditions of Michoacán.

Contact information:
Jaime Hernández Balderas
01-434-342-7865
Cell Phone: 434-107-7150
Email: pie_0968@hotmail.com
Visit : Portal Turístico de Pátzcuaro. Guía de Hoteles, Tiendas, Servicios.
I highly recommend Jaime as a guide. He speaks very good English (having been an English teacher) and he is also learning Tarascan ~ the language spoken by the local indigenous people. I learned a few new Spanish words and expressions from him, and he learned a few new English ones from me ~ as well as WHY folks from the USA and Canada are inclined to laugh when they first see a "BIMBO" truck or soccer shirt!

His charges are as follows:

Quote:
I charge $ 250. 00 pesos by the hour for two person and the cost includes vehicle (compact car) and my services as guide . vehicle for four( van )$ 280.00 pesos by the hour.


So ~ with current exchange rates, that's about US $19.50 per hour for the compact car or US $21.75 for the van.

We went with the van, because my husband is about 6'4" tall, so it gave him more room for his legs.

Jaime's uncle drove, so Jaime could chat with us safely while traveling around. There were quite a few animals loose on and around the roads, so this afforded extra safety instead of the guide driving AND talking. In several places where it was a bit crowded ~ like Quiroga and Santa Clara del Cobre, Jaime's uncle dropped us off and took care of parking the van.

We were out 6 hours each day for 2 days, so the total came to $1,680 pesos or about US $130.50 per day. We also tipped Jaime and his uncle 200 extras pesos each per day and bought Jaime's lunch each day. He picked GREAT local places to eat! The first day, near Patzcuaro, we had a 3 course comida with LOADS of choices for $60 pesos each! (About US $4.65) The second day, in a village called El Tigre, was a tiny bit more, but not much more, and REALLY GOOD FOOD as well. That place had EXCELLENT mole!!

The tours were VERY personable and Jaime was just terrific. We considered the price very reasonable. When we take tours on cruises, or have arranged for private tours in other countries, the costs were considerably more.

We did our tours with Jaime on Saturday and on Monday, as he felt that there would be more open to see on those days.
On Saturday, we did a tour of villages and workshops on the west side of Lago Patzcuaro - and also Tzintzuntzan on the east side. I might add that because SO MANY of the workshops are behind walls in people's homes, it's VERY BENEFICIAL to have a guide.

Here's a map showing the various "Artensania" villages around Lake Patzcuaro.



Each of the villages has a particular craft that they special in. This arrangement was set up by priest who understood that indigenous peoples who had been conquered by the Spanish needed a way to support themselves. By each village taking a special craft, they were able to sell to one another and outsiders as well.

Saturday was a WONDERFUL day! We purchased many small mementos - carved masks, woven containers, an embroidered pillow case, and also a HUGE woven palm sombrero to hang on a wall at home.

We first went to the workshop of master mask maker Felipe Horta which was in the mask maker's village of Tocuaro.

Felipe has been carving for a very long time and has many fantastic masks on display.

Here's a mask atop a Devil costume ~ used for special dances.



Here's Felipe working on the beginnings of a mask.



A workbench and some finished masks.



Some crucifixes and assorted tools in his outdoor workshop.



Some of Felipe's amazing masks!





I fell in love with a very special mask ~ one of museum quality. WHAT a MASK!!!!!!!!! It won first place in a crafts competition,....a Devil, an Angel, bats (inside the mouth), snakes and all sorts of other creatures.... The price for it was $6000 pesos. (about US $478.00) Mike was afraid that it might get damaged if we tried to take it home on the plane with us. We ultimately made arrangements to have it shipped to us.

Here's Felipe with the mask ~ that's now in our home in Tampa. The two photos below were taken by Jaime. I contacted him to make the arrangements with Felipe for paying for and having the mask shipped. He wanted to make CERTAIN that they were sending the correct mask.





This was a doorway in Tocuaro. Notice the print of Jesus on the cross over the doorway. The Tasarcan people tend to be VERY religious ~ Catholics, but retaining some of their own native beliefs and traditions as well.



This is a view of the surrounding countryside ~ it's really very pretty ~ and a NICE change from FLAT Tampa! There are lots of extinct and dormant volcanoes here.



The next village we visted was Jaracuaro. This place specialized in making hats.

One of the hat shops in town ~ with their "guard dogs"....



We watched the process of making these hats - including the shaping on a propane fired metal form - from beginning to end. AMAZING!

First the raw palm fronds are are hand stipped, creating long, flat "threads," and then these are woven together to make long "strings" of palm. The process is like what we did as kids ~ folding and weaving gum wrappers together. Here are bunches of these waiting to be stitched into hats.



Sewing the strips together to form the crown of the hat. That's our guide, Jaime, watching.







A heated metal press is used to form the crowns and brims into various hat styles. This machinery is co-owned by the various hat shops in the village.



Here's Jaime modeling a finished hat ~ which I bought and took back to Tampa.





This really nice sombrero cost just 50 pesos, which was a bargain! Each one takes about a half day to make!

To be continued......

Last edited by JoanieBlon; 06-18-2010 at 04:23 PM..
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Old 06-19-2010   #30 (permalink)
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More Photos From the Village of Jaracuaro

Here are a few more photos from the village of Jaracuaro. BTW ~ all the villages in this area seem to be now called by their Tarsacan/P'urhépechan names, although they also have Spanish names as well. Jaime mentioned more than once that many of the villages are referred to as "de Tejas" (of Texas) because so many of the people leave the village to go to work in Texas each year... i.e.: Cuanajo de Tejas.

This seemed to be the main street in the center of the Jaracuaro. It led up from the main road coming into town. You can see that it was quite steep, narrow, and very roughly paved. Some men were unloading a few pieces of very roughly made, primitive furniture from a truck. We were heading for the church, after having seen the hat making operation of the village.



Here’s another view from up at the top of the hill looking back down.



When we got up the hill to the church, there were a few kids playing outside. I believe their mother was the “caretaker” of the church. In all of the villages where we visited a church, there was a woman who oversaw people coming and going and kept the inside of the church swept and clean. I believe that there *may* have been one man with this role, but it seemed to be a task held by women of the villages. Jaime explained that they got paid a small salary for doing this, and each year, a new person was selected for the honor. The caretaker, who had been standing outside ducked in the door, so I wouldn’t take her picture. The kids didn’t mind, though. They were amusing themselves by taking turns being pulled along the glazed bricks set in the church’s plaza.



These are the primitive carved doors on the front of the church.



If you look closely down at the end of the street in the distance, you can see Lake Patzcuaro.



This is the churchyard plaza in Jaracuaro. I have read that Jaracuaro has a very nice “Noche de los Muertos” celebration on November 1st. All they people of the village gather in front of the church and sing traditional songs. They also have some sort of dance competition that night as well.



Interestingly enough, this tiny town has its own “bull ring.” However, in this area, they don’t do bull fighting. It’s used for bull riding, and similar rodeo type events.

YouTube had a video of the bull ring being used!



You can see the volcanic cones among the mountains in the distance. I personally thought that this whole area was breathtakingly beautiful! It's SUCH a change from Florida!





Here are some homes that are located along the main road into town from the one that encircles Lake Patzcuaro.



I hope to continue with more photos and my trip report tomorrow morning. I'm having a lot of fun going through all my photos and recalling the wonderful time we had on our trip!

Last edited by JoanieBlon; 06-19-2010 at 03:25 PM..
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