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Old 09-27-2010   #1 (permalink)
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vegetable garden

Does anybody grow veges in Playa?
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Old 09-27-2010   #2 (permalink)
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Welcome skipsue!

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Does anybody grow veges in Playa?
Say what? no offence but most people go to playa for a short time! Now how long does it take to grow vegetables? i'll be there for 28 days.. so what could I grow... I buy my vegetables at the super markets. all you need is pretty cheap in playa.. mind you I haven't been for 3 years.. I might be in for a surprise. maybe I should take some seeds down with me, just in case..
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Old 09-27-2010   #3 (permalink)
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moved down from Utah last sept. have about quarter hector south of town--I will start with shade cloth!!!
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Old 09-27-2010   #4 (permalink)
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the bugs are pretty brutal on the little plants
it can be done
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Old 09-27-2010   #5 (permalink)
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Say what? no offence but most people go to playa for a short time! Now how long does it take to grow vegetables? i'll be there for 28 days.. so what could I grow... I buy my vegetables at the super markets. all you need is pretty cheap in playa.. mind you I haven't been for 3 years.. I might be in for a surprise. maybe I should take some seeds down with me, just in case..
No offense, but some of us live here
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Old 09-27-2010   #6 (permalink)
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Say what? no offence but most people go to playa for a short time! Now how long does it take to grow vegetables? i'll be there for 28 days.. so what could I grow... I buy my vegetables at the super markets. all you need is pretty cheap in playa.. mind you I haven't been for 3 years.. I might be in for a surprise. maybe I should take some seeds down with me, just in case..
Maybe he or she lives here or plans to live here...we do have a number of forum members who live here. I'm interested in knowing the answer, to tell the truth. I dream of owning a garden, which is a pretty funny dream for someone who has historically not been capable of keeping a plant alive. If it doesn't talk or make noise in some way, I forget to feed or water it.
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Old 09-27-2010   #7 (permalink)
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i took some yellow beans seeds with me last winter,,,,but ended up making a nice pot of soup with them instead.....i think herds are the answer
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Old 09-27-2010   #8 (permalink)
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moved down from Utah last sept. have about quarter hector south of town--I will start with shade cloth!!!
bring good dirt - salt free
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Old 09-30-2010   #9 (permalink)
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I've been growing veggies every winter when we come down. We are generally there from November through April. Usually I grow tomatoes, peppers, pole beans, basil, cilantro; and cucumbers and squash in past years, but not any more. Last year I had little worms in the cukes and squash for the second year in a row and couldn't shake them. Tomatoes have been fairly easy but you must use varieties resistant to tomato yellow leaf curl virus. I bring down two varieties of seed. One is Margo and one is Champion II. All my plants were stunted and died my first year (three winters back). Then I figured out it was a virus and brought down resistant varieties the next year. Some photos


We cover the plants with netting to keep out the birds that munch on the fruit.

Peppers are easy, no bug or disease problems so far. It's very dry in the winter and that no doubt helps with disease on everything. Pole beans, basil and cilantro have also grown well for me. You need to water alot since the soil drains so well and I add any organic matter I can get. A friend , Torsten, has ducks and the duck poo is a wonder drug for vegetables. If I don't have that I fertilize with sheep shit sold in bags at Home depot as "abono de Borrego". Soil is very poor so it needs organic matter and periodic feeding (I do it about monthly with some kind of manure top dressing).

Cukes and squash have grown well but worms in the fruit is an unshakable problem for me. Here's a photo of the healthy plants of cukes and squash


I also have papayas, several types of bananas, guava, limes, tangerines, sour orange, annona, mango, rosemary and nopales planted. So far only have picked fruit on the papayas but the others won't be long as they are growing. The rosemary is great ground and fried with diced potatoes and string beans in butter. Also like grilled chicken with rosemary.

Preparing the soil is a chore involving digging down deep, removing rocks and building raised beds. I remove all the soil from the future walkways and put it in the raised beds and cover the walkways with the smaller rocks. Raised beds are edged with the rocks dug out. Paths tend to get made where the bedrock is closest to the surface. Add digging out roots etc. and you can see it's all a tremendous amount of hard work but once it's done things grow well. I bury my household compost in holes between plants to aid in building the soil. As a bonus small citrus, mango and avacado trees come up and can be moved to better locations. Here's a shot of garden prep work.
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Last edited by flowerBill; 10-03-2010 at 05:56 AM..
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Old 09-30-2010   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flowerBill View Post
I've been growing veggies every winter when we come down. We are generally there from November through April. Usually I grow tomatoes, peppers, pole beans, basil, cilantro; and cucumbers and squash in past years, but not any more. Last year I had little worms in the cukes and squash for the second year in a row and couldn't shake them. Tomatoes have been fairly easy but you must use varieties resistant to tomato yellow leaf curl virus. I bring down two varieties of seed. One is Margo and one is Champion II. All my plants were stunted and died my first year (three winters back). Then I figured out it was a virus and brought down resistant varieties the next year. Some photos


We cover the plants with netting to keep out the birds that munch on the fruit.

Peppers are easy, no bug or disease problems so far. It's very dry in the winter and that no doubt helps with disease on everything. Pole beans, basil and cilantro have also grown well for me. You need to water alot since the soil drains so well and I add any organic matter I can get. A friend , Torsten, has ducks and the duck poo is a wonder drug for vegetables. If I don't have that I fertilize with sheep shit sold in bags at Home depot as "something de Borrego". Soil is very poor so it needs organic matter and periodic feeding (I do it about monthly with some kind of manure top dressing).

Cukes and squash have grown well but worms in the fruit is an unshakable problem for me. Here's a photo of the healthy plants of cukes and squash


I also have papayas, several types of bananas, guava, limes, tangerines, sour orange, annona, mango, rosemary and nopales planted. So far only have picked fruit on the papayas but the others won't be long as they are growing. The rosemary is great ground and fried with diced potatoes and string beans in butter. Also like grilled chicken with rosemary.

Preparing the soil is a chore involving digging down deep, removing rocks and building raised beds. I remove all the soil from the future walkways and put it in the raised beds and cover the walkways with the smaller rocks. Raised beds are edged with the rocks dug out. Paths tend to get made where the bedrock is closest to the surface. Add digging out roots etc. and you can see it's all a tremendous amount of hard work but once it's done things grow well. I bury my household compost in holes between plants to aid in building the soil. As a bonus small citrus, mango and avacado trees come up and can be moved to better locations. Here's a shot of garden prep work.

great work!!
veggie gardening is not easy down here
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Old 09-30-2010   #11 (permalink)
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Thats really cool....good job
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Old 03-29-2011   #12 (permalink)
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Here are a couple of photos of tomatoes, spinach, and basil from my garden, end of March 2011.


Last edited by Bill B; 03-29-2011 at 02:27 PM..
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Old 04-03-2011   #13 (permalink)
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Wow, thank you for sharing those photos, that is so inspirational!! I've got this burning desire to grow a veggie garden here, but like Heather I've never had much of a green thumb, so I'm really starting from scratch.
Right now I've got a couple varieties of tomato plants (no clue if they're resistant to that virus), green pepper, watermelon, papaya and assorted herbs. About half is in pots and half in the ground - can't really say dirt at this point as there doesn't really seem to be any, but I'm impressed how well they've done so far with seemingly so little to work. with. So my main interest right now if figuring out how to compost here. Is burying it in the ground the only way to avoid critter problems? I seem to have bedrock right at the surface just about everywhere so I don't think burying will work for me. Has anyone built an enclosed compost bin? I've got plans to build raised beds but would like to make some good soil to do that with. Any thoughts would be appreciated, thanks!
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Old 04-14-2011   #14 (permalink)
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Yes, this area is a big limestone rock. Here at SacBe we mostly use raised beds with rock walls, since there is no rock shortage. Our compost is made in big piles of organic debris, kitchen and garden waste, manure, whatever we can find. We are rural, so we don't need designer compost bins. I just plant a little of everything and see what survives. My two big lessons are: plant in sunny areas, and cover with nets to keep the birds from eating everything. I have been reading a lot about container gardening and plan to start on that this year. Eventually I will post results if I make some progress with that.
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Old 04-15-2011   #15 (permalink)
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The heat is beating me and my garden!! I think the trouble with my raised beds--rock walls-(plenty of rock in xcaret also)-is the soil gets so hot-even the peppers are going down--I put some shade cloth up, but again it's the heat!! Could be time for fallow--the basil still looks good, but its in partial shade for the entire day-
I noticed I do have 2 papayas on the tree--a first! I will enjoy whatever I can grow, and keep trying for the right combo. of everything!But SHADE is at the top of the list!!
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