Playa del Carmen, Mexico's virtual guidebook written by locals
 

Go Back   www.Playa.info > Off Topic Stuff > General Off-Topic Stuff
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-20-2013   #31 (permalink)
añejo
 
Mercy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 10,717
Religion in the Sea
'

Marines headed for Afghanistan baptized in ocean off Camp Pendleton - latimes.com
Mercy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #32 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,928
Argument from queerness pretty much stops the particular religion you believe in from being true in any particular sense.

Believing in things that aren't true can be a mostly harmless or even productive pastime, as it is for the vast majority of western people, or it can be very dangerous.

It's therefore recommended to make sure you remember your religious beliefs should be treated as no more than a pastime, or maybe a way to get junior to attend more school than otherwise necessary (and learn what you think is Hebrew) while you secretly pray that he doesn't bring home a shiksa. If you think of your beliefs as anything more, or if you think harm should come to those who don't share them then you should seek treatment.

p.s. religion is generally pretty expensive, you need lots and lots of oil to compensate for it. Keep that in mind:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...PperCapita.png
ProfessorPibil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #33 (permalink)
¡No mames güey!
 
roni's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mérida, Yucatán
Posts: 75,227
I observed baptisms in the sea growing up in Brasil. Much more powerful visuals than the usual church baptistry, but same effect on the believers, I think.
roni is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #34 (permalink)
añejo
 
gingele's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 12,825
Send a message via Skype™ to gingele
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorPibil View Post
Argument from queerness pretty much stops the particular religion you believe in from being true in any particular sense.

Believing in things that aren't true can be a mostly harmless or even productive pastime, as it is for the vast majority of western people, or it can be very dangerous.

It's therefore recommended to make sure you remember your religious beliefs should be treated as no more than a pastime, or maybe a way to get junior to attend more school than otherwise necessary (and learn what you think is Hebrew) while you secretly pray that he doesn't bring home a shiksa. If you think of your beliefs as anything more, or if you think harm should come to those who don't share them then you should seek treatment.

p.s. religion is generally pretty expensive, you need lots and lots of oil to compensate for it. Keep that in mind:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...PperCapita.png
You are really talking out of your a** here, PP. You have zero idea why I send "junior" to religious school, not one real notion as to my motivations or expectations in that regard, and clearly have no understanding of my son and what he may or may not be actually getting out of the experience.

Instead of piling presumptions on top of suppositions about both myself and my son in this regard, perhaps you should reserve such arrogance for some other individual(s) of whom you might actually know what the f*ck you are talking about. As far as I am concerned, you can take your poorly disguised insults - oh, sorry, "recommendations" - and shove 'em up your pompous, ill-informed a**.

And you are certainly NOT getting an invitation to the Bar Mitzvah.
gingele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #35 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,928
I wasn't talking about you at all, just used your example for random stuff people do as it was handy. It was a general recommendation but you can swap Sunday school for Hebrew school if it helps you think it's not particularly about you.

I'm sorry that invite is not coming, I was looking forward to it.

p.s. I had to be bribed with a Commodore VIC-20 so that I'd agree to have a Bar Mitzvah. I guess I too benefited from (someone else's) religion!
ProfessorPibil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #36 (permalink)
añejo
 
gingele's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 12,825
Send a message via Skype™ to gingele
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorPibil View Post
I wasn't talking about you at all, just used your example for random stuff people do as it was handy. It was a general recommendation but you can swap Sunday school for Hebrew school if it helps you think it's not particularly about you.

I'm sorry that invite is not coming, I was looking forward to it.

p.s. I had to be bribed with a Commodore VIC-20 so that I'd agree to have a Bar Mitzvah. I guess I too benefited from (someone else's) religion!
Except for your comment about him learning what he "thinks is Hebrew," followed by "and secretly pray that he doesn't marry a shiksa?" I dunno, doesn't seem to generic of a comment to me.

Regardless, there are many, many other reasons to send a child to religious school. Certainly my purposes in sending my son(s) have nothing to do with any of the items you mentioned - particularly the expectation that they actually learn conversational Hebrew, which never has been part of the curriculum - and the reasons were different for both children. For my youngest ("junior") it was so that he learn a sense of community, that he become familiar with the synagogue, the staff and his peers. So that he learn that there is a world he belongs to in addition to the one he has at public school. It is so that he becomes familiar with some of the liturgy (simple blessings, the Shema) and some of the traditions, things that we reflect at home. If it wasn't for Hebrew School, he may have never discovered his favorite song (Dayenu) - a song that he proudly leads the entire Seder in every year at Passover. But for him it was mostly so that he learn that the shul is another place for him to feel welcome and accepted and a part of - something that is often challenging for a child with autism.

As for worrying about either of them marrying a shiksa - now that would be a tad hypocritical seeing as their mother is married to their father, a shaygetz.

Last edited by gingele; 05-20-2013 at 09:17 AM..
gingele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #37 (permalink)
añejo
 
Dan-0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 5,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingele View Post
As for worrying about either of them marrying a shiksa - now that would be a tad hypocritical seeing as their mother is married to their father, a shaygetz.
OK, I'm actually learning something here....
shiksa- female Gentile
shaygetz- male Gentile

Is that how it goes?

Reading this thread's making me a little verklempt this morning.
Dan-0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #38 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,928
I've heard a lot of Hebrew school Hebrew - Hebrew it is not, and I know from Hebrew.

Sorry, it was a joke, I can assure you there was nothing pointed at you, really. I couldn't care less about someone's motivations for sending their kids to religious school.

Now, people becoming offended, or more likely pretending to have become offended by the assertion that their religion is just a harmless and maybe even productive hobby... that's where the problem starts.
ProfessorPibil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #39 (permalink)
añejo
 
Luv2Dance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 26,301
You Yank My Chain..........

Luv2Dance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #40 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan-0 View Post
OK, I'm actually learning something here....
shiksa- female Gentile
shaygetz- male Gentile

Is that how it goes?

Reading this thread's making me a little verklempt this morning.
Yes, but there are some other subtexts that go with shiksa.
ProfessorPibil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #41 (permalink)
añejo
 
gingele's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 12,825
Send a message via Skype™ to gingele
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan-0 View Post
OK, I'm actually learning something here....
shiksa- female Gentile
shaygetz- male Gentile

Is that how it goes?

Reading this thread's making me a little verklempt this morning.
Yes, you are picking it up nicely. The literal translations are as you say, but note that the terms can carry a derogatory implication, depending on the context.
gingele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #42 (permalink)
añejo
 
Dan-0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 5,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingele View Post
Yes, you are picking it up nicely. The literal translations are as you say, but note that the terms can carry a derogatory implication, depending on the context.
Thanks! I've now exhausted my Yiddish/Hebrew vocabulary.

BTW, I think it's great that you're sending your children to Hebrew school and passing on your religious/cultural traditions to them. I think that says a lot about you as a parent. And it's nobody's business anyway how you choose to raise your children.
Dan-0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #43 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorPibil View Post
...p.s. religion is generally pretty expensive, you need lots and lots of oil to compensate for it. Keep that in mind:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...PperCapita.png
The introductory rhetoric aside, religious beliefs do come at a cost, but may also bring great benefit (or harm) to a culture, society and/or country - so balancing the risks and costs versus the benefits is important, hence the graph, with Saudi Arabia being a prime example of high religious cost (educational backwater, as measured by poor intrinsic scientific and technological development, with the vast majority of science and technology being imported) counter-balanced by lots of oil to defray the costs (they can afford to import science and technology - Need a plumber? Doctor? Engineer? Hire one).

Other highly religious societies are not so fortunate (e.g., Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Chechnya, Albania, etc.). Overall, the so-called 'dead hand' of Islam effectively discourages inquiry and original thinking, and so it fails to foster and encourage meaningful training in science and technology - the strictures associated with its religious principles do not provide fertile ground for broad educational growth and development.

The linked graph is exceedingly hard to read, but based on what I think I see regarding what it purports to measure, Vietnam (strangely, and emotionally, enough) looks like the most likely potential dark horse 'winner' (on this graph) because of its relatively low religious 'burden' (it is, after all, officially an 'atheist' country in theory, if not in practice) and its relatively high offshore oil reserves (for which it will likely have to battle both China and the Philippines) - if it should win those battles, either diplomatically or otherwise (less likely vs China, more likely vs. The Philippines), it could move laterally (farther to the right) on the graph relatively rapidly (a new Asian 'Tiger' economy), eventually landing somewhere among the technologically-savvy and oil-rich Norway, oil-poor Hong Kong, and oil-some Singapore crowd.

Religious beliefs can either help or hinder - historically they have been more of a hindrance than otherwise. Although I suspect most readers may think the information on the graph might be nothing more than an interesting exercise, it may be considerably more than that - (if only I could see it well enough to read the damn thing).
beam-eye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #44 (permalink)
añejo
 
Mercy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 10,717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorPibil View Post
Argument from queerness pretty much stops the particular religion you believe in from being true in any particular sense.

Believing in things that aren't true can be a mostly harmless or even productive pastime, as it is for the vast majority of western people, or it can be very dangerous.

It's therefore recommended to make sure you remember your religious beliefs should be treated as no more than a pastime, or maybe a way to get junior to attend more school than otherwise necessary (and learn what you think is Hebrew) while you secretly pray that he doesn't bring home a shiksa. If you think of your beliefs as anything more, or if you think harm should come to those who don't share them then you should seek treatment.

p.s. religion is generally pretty expensive, you need lots and lots of oil to compensate for it. Keep that in mind:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...PperCapita.png
For a Professor, you sure don't know a whole lot
Mercy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013   #45 (permalink)
añejo
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercy View Post
For a Professor, you sure don't know a whole lot
I know nothing, please explain to me how your vernacular religion (some form of Christianity) just happens to be right and you just happened to have been born where it is practiced. Isn't that an amazing coincidence?
ProfessorPibil is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:27 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.