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Old 07-21-2017   #31 (permalink)
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More news on PdC , & Cancun area

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-beach-resorts
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Old 07-21-2017   #32 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Mr Cancun View Post
This article contains in it (but you have to read between the lines), the political situation I refer to in another thread. The guy in the black shirt is key.

Also, the reason tourists in Cancun have no idea what is happening is because it is happening nowhere near them. It is all out in regions, where no tourist is going to go unless they fall asleep on the bus for an hour.
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Old 07-21-2017   #33 (permalink)
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Extortion? In at least three cases, travelers reported that local hospitals, part of the Hospiten chain, appeared to be gouging them, demanding large sums of cash. One man was told to take a cab to an ATM. The vacationers suspected Iberostar might be in cahoots with the medical company. The resort contracts with Hospiten and refers sick and injured guests to Hospiten's facilities.
Hospiten is a private hospital, and the best one around, hands down. It requires a 'hold' on your CC or ATM card for whatever amount seems 'reasonable' based on somebody's assessment of what they think your condition will require before you are seen. After treatment their itemized charges are subtracted from that, the 'hold' on your card is released, and the actual amount is submitted on your card. It's a sound business practice in a tourist area where people walk off without paying.

One giant flaw with that, though (which can work to the detriment of either or both parties), is that they don't have a triage nurse or anybody else who can come up with a realistic assessment of what the problem is and what it will cost to treat it, which makes it relatively open-ended (as medical care often is - you don't know what you've got until you start looking and treating, as every nurse and doc knows).

Compared to US prices, Hospiten's prices are a bargain, and they give locals 20-30% discount, just as restaurants do. Are they in league with the AIs in some sort of illegal conspiracy to bilk the unwary victim who wakes up in an unknown hospital with his wallet rifled? I severely doubt it. If your life means anything at all to you, you should count your lucky stars you got taken there instead of somewhere else.
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Old 07-21-2017   #34 (permalink)
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This is a good example of why all foreigners should have a travel health insurance policy. Which leads me to my question for beam-eye or other expats...

If you have such a policy, will Hospiten treat you without requiring a credit card or cash up front? I don't like to use my credit card at all when I travel abroad and I sure don't usually have access to that kind of cash.
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Old 07-21-2017   #35 (permalink)
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Re: this:



Hospiten is a private hospital, and the best one around, hands down. It requires a 'hold' on your CC or ATM card for whatever amount seems 'reasonable' based on somebody's assessment of what they think your condition will require before you are seen. After treatment their itemized charges are subtracted from that, the 'hold' on your card is released, and the actual amount is submitted on your card. It's a sound business practice in a tourist area where people walk off without paying.

One giant flaw with that, though (which can work to the detriment of either or both parties), is that they don't have a triage nurse or anybody else who can come up with a realistic assessment of what the problem is and what it will cost to treat it, which makes it relatively open-ended (as medical care often is - you don't know what you've got until you start looking and treating, as every nurse and doc knows).

Compared to US prices, Hospiten's prices are a bargain, and they give locals 20-30% discount, just as restaurants do. Are they in league with the AIs in some sort of illegal conspiracy to bilk the unwary victim who wakes up in an unknown hospital with his wallet rifled? I severely doubt it. If your life means anything at all to you, you should count your lucky stars you got taken there instead of somewhere else.
I trust you on this completely....when you do some digging, the 'scam' stories are all vastly outweighed by the good ones (like here).

There still might be renegades acting alone who pull fast ones on unsuspecting tourists here and there, which would explain the stories -that is more likely than any kind of organized scam.
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Old 07-21-2017   #36 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan-0 View Post
This is a good example of why all foreigners should have a travel health insurance policy. Which leads me to my question for beam-eye or other expats...

If you have such a policy, will Hospiten treat you without requiring a credit card or cash up front? I don't like to use my credit card at all when I travel abroad and I sure don't usually have access to that kind of cash.

I have private health insurance through AXA which is a major provider here and Hospiten still require a deposit from me. Usually it's a few thousand pesos or less, so usually I do cash.


Though the last time I went in for a routine scheduled appointment, they didn't ask for any deposit.


I suspect their emergency billing policies are different from their scheduled services.
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Old 07-21-2017   #37 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Dan-0 View Post
This is a good example of why all foreigners should have a travel health insurance policy. Which leads me to my question for beam-eye or other expats...

If you have such a policy, will Hospiten treat you without requiring a credit card or cash up front? I don't like to use my credit card at all when I travel abroad and I sure don't usually have access to that kind of cash.
Hospiten typically requires a hold on your CC or ATM card if you are not a local. As Drew points out, once they get to know you, and if the procedure is a minor one, they just give you the bill afterwards, no card-hold required. For US insurance, they accept it only if you are having a relatively 'non-minor' procedure (e.g, broken leg with open reduction) and/or need to be admitted to the hospital and only if they can get the insurance company to pre-approve your procedure and/or admission and stay (and they will let you use the phone for a free call to your insurance company and stay on as long as necessary to get that done). Otherwise, for procedures not requiring admission to the hospital, they give you a complete report, all X-ray films and lab results, and an itemized bill for submission to your health insurance company for re-imbursement.

Last edited by beam-eye; 07-21-2017 at 01:51 PM..
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Old 07-21-2017   #38 (permalink)
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Mexican hospital holding baby as


Since we're on the topic of Hospiten hostage taking....


Here's a story of another American family blaming Mexico and "criminal Hospiten" for saving their baby's life, while charging them half of what the cost would be in the US.


If you're going to travel 28 weeks pregnant, check with your insurance and buy a travel health policy.
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Old 07-21-2017   #39 (permalink)
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What kind of people actually travel out of their own country without out -of -country emergency medical insurance?

I mean, I usually don't bother with buying trip cancellation and interruption insurance (technically my credit card covers me anyway, no need to buy extra) - but no medical insurance? That's just dumb- no?
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Old 07-21-2017   #40 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Rissask View Post
What kind of people actually travel out of their own country without out -of -country emergency medical insurance?

I mean, I usually don't bother with buying trip cancellation and interruption insurance (technically my credit card covers me anyway, no need to buy extra) - but no medical insurance? That's just dumb- no?
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Old 07-22-2017   #41 (permalink)
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In May, within hours of landing in Cozumel, I was having severe symptoms that I thought were due to a bowel obstruction. To be fair, the internist covering the ED at Costamed/CMC thought so, as well. CT showed a large ureteral stone. I spent most of the day on a stretcher getting REALLY good nursing care, being seen promptly by the urologist, and being discharged with a good aftercare plan. Nobody cared that I'm a physician and they kept asking what ship I'd been on, though our house is a 5 minute drive away. I'm confident I got the same excellent care as anyone else would have.

We put the imaging and ED charges on the AmEx. They came to several hundred (not thousand) dollars. We've applied for reimbursement from our travel insurance. It's very possible that under some other circumstances they might have asked for a deposit, perhaps a large one.

With a single exception, every person outside my family I've told about spending a day in a Mexican hospital ED bay for a ureteral stone has expressed horrified sympathy - not for the stone part, but for the "Mexican hospital" part. I keep telling them that every part of the experience was better than it would have been at my own hospital (where everyone knows me as the medical director of a department who's been there for 22 years), not to mention far less expensive.

I can't prove what happened in relation to some of the news stories about tourists' experiences at hospitals in the area because I wasn't there. Given that I have had roughly a dozen patients over the years angrily tell me what Dr. Stevens* had told them that was the opposite of what I was saying and which meant that I was an idiot who was trying to murder them by malpractice, I am utterly convinced that those reports resulted from misunderstandings. Those abound when people are worried and unwell.

*For the removal of doubt, that is I.
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Old 07-22-2017   #42 (permalink)
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Never mind.

Last edited by jackjackattack; 07-22-2017 at 11:16 PM..
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Old 07-23-2017   #43 (permalink)
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Fears of tainted alcohol at Mexican resorts after deaths

Tourists to multiple upscale resorts in and around Cancun and Playa del Carmen say they believe they were drugged or served bootleg alcohol after small amounts of booze caused them to lose consciousness.
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Old 07-23-2017   #44 (permalink)
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Fears of tainted alcohol at Mexican resorts after deaths

Tourists to multiple upscale resorts in and around Cancun and Playa del Carmen say they believe they were drugged or served bootleg alcohol after small amounts of booze caused them to lose consciousness.
Balderdash.
What motive would a resort have to serve a tainted drink to a guest?
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Old 07-23-2017   #45 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by mstevens View Post
In May, within hours of landing in Cozumel, I was having severe symptoms that I thought were due to a bowel obstruction. To be fair, the internist covering the ED at Costamed/CMC thought so, as well. CT showed a large ureteral stone. I spent most of the day on a stretcher getting REALLY good nursing care, being seen promptly by the urologist, and being discharged with a good aftercare plan. Nobody cared that I'm a physician and they kept asking what ship I'd been on, though our house is a 5 minute drive away. I'm confident I got the same excellent care as anyone else would have.

We put the imaging and ED charges on the AmEx. They came to several hundred (not thousand) dollars. We've applied for reimbursement from our travel insurance. It's very possible that under some other circumstances they might have asked for a deposit, perhaps a large one.

With a single exception, every person outside my family I've told about spending a day in a Mexican hospital ED bay for a ureteral stone has expressed horrified sympathy - not for the stone part, but for the "Mexican hospital" part. I keep telling them that every part of the experience was better than it would have been at my own hospital (where everyone knows me as the medical director of a department who's been there for 22 years), not to mention far less expensive.

I can't prove what happened in relation to some of the news stories about tourists' experiences at hospitals in the area because I wasn't there. Given that I have had roughly a dozen patients over the years angrily tell me what Dr. Stevens* had told them that was the opposite of what I was saying and which meant that I was an idiot who was trying to murder them by malpractice, I am utterly convinced that those reports resulted from misunderstandings. Those abound when people are worried and unwell.

*For the removal of doubt, that is I.
It is axiomatic in medicine, human nature being what it is, that no matter how carefully explanations are presented to patients, they often (if not invariably) hear only the worst possible news rather than the long and detailed boring explanation of other possibilities. The accompanying Letter from a 'therapist' to the Editor of the New York Times Science page from May 8, 2001, relates a common experience that most health care providers find out the hard way:

Quote:
'What I find interesting is that clients have often come back to me and told me they have (or haven't) tried what I suggested, and what they report they heard may bear little resemblance to what I remember saying. I am often appalled, amused or grateful for their misinterpretation. I would argue that clients interpret our actions in ways we can't predict, no matter what we do.'"
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