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Old 01-13-2018   #1 (permalink)
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Race - Is the Field Now Level?

A very interesting and well-reasoned piece by an African American conservative, Shelby Steele. Worth taking the time to read and discuss, if we can do so on an adult level. I can't say I agree 100% but I am a lot more in agreement with his thoughts than not. Of course, I am not African American, but he is. Thoughts? Racists (which he recognizes, like stupid people, are never going to go away) need not respond but the gist is

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The recent protests by black players in the National Football League were rather sad for their fruitlessness. They may point to the end of an era for black America, and for the country generally—an era in which protest has been the primary means of black advancement in American life.

There was a forced and unconvincing solemnity on the faces of these players as they refused to stand for the national anthem. They seemed more dutiful than passionate, as if they were mimicking the courage of earlier black athletes who had protested: Tommie Smith and John Carlos, fists in the air at the 1968 Olympics; Muhammad Ali, fearlessly raging against the Vietnam War; Jackie Robinson, defiantly running the bases in the face of racist taunts. The NFL protesters seemed to hope for a little ennoblement by association.

And protest has long been an ennobling tradition in black American life. From the Montgomery bus boycott to the march on Selma, from lunch-counter sit-ins and Freedom Rides to the 1963 March on Washington, only protest could open the way to freedom and the acknowledgment of full humanity. So it was a high calling in black life. It required great sacrifice and entailed great risk. Martin Luther King Jr. , the archetypal black protester, made his sacrifices, ennobled all of America, and was then shot dead.

For the NFL players there was no real sacrifice, no risk and no achievement. Still, in black America there remains a great reverence for protest. Through protest—especially in the 1950s and ’60s—we, as a people, touched greatness. Protest, not immigration, was our way into the American Dream. Freedom in this country had always been relative to race, and it was black protest that made freedom an absolute.

It is not surprising, then, that these black football players would don the mantle of protest. The surprise was that it didn’t work. They had misread the historic moment. They were not speaking truth to power. Rather, they were figures of pathos, mindlessly loyal to a black identity that had run its course.

What they missed is a simple truth that is both obvious and unutterable: The oppression of black people is over with. This is politically incorrect news, but it is true nonetheless. We blacks are, today, a free people. It is as if freedom sneaked up and caught us by surprise.
Like I said, progressive, centrist or conservative, a very interesting and though-provoking piece.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/black-p...wer-1515800438

Last edited by PlayadelSolDos; 01-13-2018 at 08:45 PM..
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #2 (permalink)
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One of my long time co-workers, hisself a Black American, has been saying the same since the NFL protests started.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #3 (permalink)
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Good insight...I have always felt is was a sad attempt and did not really accomplish anything.

There were/are better ways they could have made a real difference.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #4 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by TAPPY View Post
Good insight...I have always felt is was a sad attempt and did not really accomplish anything.

There were/are better ways they could have made a real difference.
I agree, instead of gaining sympathy for their cause, they just angered a lot of people. Instead of jumping on the Colin Kaepernick band wagon, with their celebrity and wealth, they should have thought it through and possibly made a real difference.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Mercy View Post
I agree, instead of gaining sympathy for their cause, they just angered a lot of people. Instead of jumping on the Colin Kaepernick band wagon, with their celebrity and wealth, they should have thought it through and possibly made a real difference.
You didn't really read the article, did you?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #6 (permalink)
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I can’t read the article without a paid subscription.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #7 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by PlayadelSolDos View Post
You didn't really read the article, did you?
I read what you posted.

I pretty much agreed with Tappy and said the same thing. Why didn't you call her out?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Babaloo View Post
I can’t read the article without a paid subscription.
Which means we are only halfway throught the month and you have already used up your alloted free WSJ stories? Holy conservative credential booster! (although WSJ has lost a bit of its conservative streed cred, IMHO).
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #9 (permalink)
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This was a good read: (sorry link police I cant get a link to post this morning)

"The Left has lost credibility on using the word racist. Here are ten thoughts on the president’s alleged use of the word “sh**hole” in describing Haiti, a Central American country, and African countries: 1. There are few filters between President Donald Trump’s mind and mouth. That is his appeal and his weakness. It is very common that a person’s strengths are also weaknesses. I wish Trump’s tweets and comments were as forthright — as un-PC — as they are now but stated in a sophisticated way. I also wish that cheesecake were not fattening. But just as cheesecake comes with sugar, Donald Trump comes with unsophisticated rhetoric. People are packages, not a la carte menus. 2. As a rule, a president of the United States should not label countries, let alone continents, “sh**holes.” I don’t know what word the president actually used, but had he used the word “dysfunctional” instead of “sh**hole,” that actually might have been a service to the people of many of these countries. I have been to 20 African countries. Corruption is Africa’s greatest single problem. That’s why those who truly care about Africans, many of whom are terrific people, need to honestly describe the moral state of many or most African countries. What benefit is it to honest, hardworking Africans or Latin Americans or others to deny the endemic corruption of these societies? As Guatemalan columnist Claudia Nunez wrote on Trump in the Guatemalan newspaper Siglio 21: “The epithets he uses to describe certain groups are unfortunate and exemplify the decadence of the current political scene. But he has also said things that are true, for example, that it is we citizens of migration countries who have accommodated ourselves to the need to export people, as we have calmly allowed excessive levels of corruption to grow for decades.” 3. Though many wonderful immigrants come from the world’s worst places, there is some connection between the moral state of an immigrant’s country and the immigrant’s contribution to America. According to data from the Center for Immigration Studies, 73 percent of households headed by Central American and Mexican immigrants use one or more welfare programs, as do 51 percent of Caribbean immigrants and 48 percent of African immigrants. Contrast that with 32 percent of East Asians and 26 percent of Europeans. 4. The press’s constant description of Trump as a racist, a white supremacist, a fascist, and an anti-Semite has been a Big Lie. It is meant to hurt the president, but it mostly damages the country and the media. To cite the most often provided “evidence” for the president’s racism, the president never said or implied that the neo-Nazis at the infamous Charlottesville, Va, demonstrations were “fine people.” The “fine people” he referred to were the pro- and anti-statue removal demonstrators. 5. Why are the Left’s repeated descriptions of America as “systemically racist” not the moral equivalent of the word “sh**hole”? The Left’s descriptions of America and its white majority are at least as offensive, less true, and not made in private or semi-private conversations but in the open (in most college classes, for example). 6. The poor choice of language notwithstanding, can any countries be legitimately described as “sh**holes”? As Ben Shapiro, a Never-Trumper, wrote, “The argument that Trump is wrong to call some countries sh**holes comes down to nicety, not truth — which is why Rich Lowry of National Review took Joan Walsh of CNN to the woodshed over whether she’d rather live in Haiti or Norway.” Walsh refused to respond, giving the specious response that she hasn’t been to either country. 7. That the president allows himself to speak openly to Democrats — whose overriding ambition is to undo his election — is testament to his self-confidence, if not his hubris. And his naiveté. 8. What people say in private is neither my business nor my concern. That’s why I wrote a column in the Wall Street Journal in the 1990s defending Hillary Clinton against charges of anti-Semitism for allegedly directing expletive-filled anti-Jewish comments in private against a Jewish campaign official she felt was responsible for Bill Clinton’s lost congressional race. Former president Harry Truman’s private use of the word “kike” was also mentioned. In the Age of Non-Wisdom in which we live, many well-educated people (and, therefore, often the least wise among us) think private speech reveals all you need to know about someone. But in truth, private speech may reveal nothing about people. If everything you or I said in private were revealed to the world, we could all be made to look awful. 9. The Washington Post reports that the president also said he would be open to more immigrants from Asian countries. That would seem to invalidate the racism charge. Had he just met with the prime minister of Singapore, as he had with the prime minister of Norway, he may well have said we need more immigrants from Singapore. As the Never-Trump editors of National Review editorialized, “What he was almost certainly trying to get at, in his typically confused way, is that we’d be better off with immigrants with higher skills.” 10. The Left has lost all credibility in using the term “racist.” The University of California lists as an example of a “microaggression” the statement “There is only one race, the human race.” The left labels anyone who opposes race-based quotas, or all-black college dorms, or the Black Lives Matter movement “racist.” And it labeled President Trump’s Warsaw-speech call to preserve Western civilization a call to preserve white supremacy. On race the Left has cried wolf so often that if real wolves ever show up, few will believe it."
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #10 (permalink)
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If we're so post-racial, why the increase in membership in white identity groups? What used to be a dark net niche and closed basement meetings for nutters is gaining a much more substantial audience. The SPLC didn't recreate that march in Charleston.

I didn't read the article, either. NFL players were not even on the field for the anthem till someone came up with the bright idea to gin up patriotism. It's a distraction from real sports like baseball and figure skating.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melliedee View Post
If we're so post-racial, why the increase in membership in white identity groups? What used to be a dark net niche and closed basement meetings for nutters is gaining a much more substantial audience. The SPLC didn't recreate that march in Charleston.

I didn't read the article, either. NFL players were not even on the field for the anthem till someone came up with the bright idea to gin up patriotism. It's a distraction from real sports like baseball and figure skating.
You should. You might find you agree with some/much of it.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melliedee View Post
If we're so post-racial, why the increase in membership in white identity groups? What used to be a dark net niche and closed basement meetings for nutters is gaining a much more substantial audience. The SPLC didn't recreate that march in Charleston.

I didn't read the article, either. NFL players were not even on the field for the anthem till someone came up with the bright idea to gin up patriotism. It's a distraction from real sports like baseball and figure skating.
Are we talking a 15%, 150%, or 1500% increase over the 8,500 current "white identity" idiots? I've searched for data supprting your "increase in membership" and came up with nada.

These pathetic "White identity group" morons are a pimple on the ass of humanity. Period.

There's reason to believe that the number of those who identify as members of the 'New Black Panthers' matches the number of fools who identify as bad-ass delusional white supremacists.



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