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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #31 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by krazzy View Post
Gary, thanks for posting up again, you and Abril are doing a great job, very interesting and a joy to view.
Maybe its time to buy your casa down there, pretty sure you would enjoy it, again thankyou.
I was looking at a few there in the central Yucatan, prices were ranging between $7500.00 to 35 k Canadian with no rhyme or reason value wise why. Some of those guys see me and jack the price right up...rich Canadian thing I guess. One guy wanted over a million pesos for a dump on the main drag.
I'm just not sure I am ready to settle in just one place. Once I buy somewhere I might feel I have to spend a bunch of time there. Still, $7500.00 is a drop in the bucket... just got to be sure to get title as some folks there sell and buy without them.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #32 (permalink)
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I enjoy your trip reports!! Thanks for starting a new one.
I will keep the photos coming.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #33 (permalink)
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After the ruins we passed by the Zotz cave site and I would love to be there one evening if I was staying nearby. Every evening millions, yes millions of bats erupt from Zotz cave in a giant bat volcano. Some time I will get there.

Have to stop for food on the way through. Chicken cooked in a barrel.









Might want to go easy on this stuff though.

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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #34 (permalink)
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Eventually after passing down various backroads we reached Sabancuy. The town itself is located on an estuary and there is a causeway with six bridges that joins it to the long sand island that forms the coast in that area. Sabancuy is about halfway down the gulf of mexico on the eastern side. I have been back and forth there before but just wanted to see a bit more.


We stayed at this Posada at the east end of town. Looked modern but looks are deceiving. Wifi no good there either but it seemed better that the other place I stayed before.









Of course the real draw for many is the beach across the bridges.














A lot of garbage has blown in from the sea and even the plants are hunkered down from when the wind blows.





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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #35 (permalink)
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Abril's pet monkey

Later stopped for cervezas and food along the seawall in Sabancuy at El Tiburon Jarocho.





Shared camarons a la veracruzana. I have had Veracruz sauce different places, but this here has to be the absolute best.






And then what should come strolling along but a monkey!






I could see he had been here before as he jumped up on a chair and was helping himself to tortilla chips.







The owner chased him off the table but later was sharing some gum with him.





He groped Abril's legs a bit and then went off across the street to ham it up.






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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #36 (permalink)
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Making me hungry.........

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I did have enough energy to get out a bit each day though and Jose Maria Morelos is a nice quiet little town. I looked at various places for sale... might get this one..








And went out for some good food. Check out this Koox Janal place!













I don't think these cocktails were even 200 pesos for both.
With these excellent photos of nummy looking food........this is not in Playa.So are you buying thatcasita?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #37 (permalink)
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Keep up the excellent job!I love seeing the real Mexico again.........Your tales put a smile on my face!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #38 (permalink)
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With these excellent photos of nummy looking food........this is not in Playa.So are you buying thatcasita?
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Keep up the excellent job!I love seeing the real Mexico again.........Your tales put a smile on my face!
Morelos can be a contrast of things, the very poor from villages outside of town and the more well to do from the town.

Food ranges from the basic 5 to 10 peso item.





To fairly fancy places like this coffee shop.









The sign reminding you to wash up before you eat...good advice if you don't want to get sick. So much food in Mexico is eaten with your hands.











But nothing is too expensive. Not like I see in PDC or any of the tourist areas I have visited around the coastal areas, the gulf of Mexico and Pacific coast included. Once the tourist sharks move into a place, you end up having to hunt around to avoid the tourist prices. You will pretty much have to know some Spanish to get by though... not much if any English spoken around there and I don't even try to speak English back in the local areas. Some people even speak Maya words mixed with Spanish to make it more interesting/challenging.

Just might buy that casita yet.

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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #39 (permalink)
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I remember being outside a Mercado getting a panucho breakfast from a lady with a cart there. Her little girl was watching miss Abril and suddenly her mouth flew open and she hurried to her friend nearby, whispering and both shooting glances at April.
When I asked mom what was happening, she laughed and said the girl had noticed Abril was speaking English.
I'm sure part of the reason Abril puts up with me is because I can/will travel within the local infrastructure even though it can be a struggle at times.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #40 (permalink)
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I remember being outside a Mercado getting a panucho breakfast from a lady with a cart there. Her little girl was watching miss Abril and suddenly her mouth flew open and she hurried to her friend nearby, whispering and both shooting glances at April.
When I asked mom what was happening, she laughed and said the girl had noticed Abril was speaking English.
I'm sure part of the reason Abril puts up with me is because I can/will travel within the local infrastructure even though it can be a struggle at times.
Abril puts up with GaryD because he exudes confidence and is willing to go anywhere and try anything! Even the ‘bandidos’ didn’t scare him off! (You’ll have to stay tuned to hear about those adventures! Lol!)
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #41 (permalink)
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...Some people even speak Maya words mixed with Spanish to make it more interesting/challenging...
Here are a few words/phrases in Yucatecan Maya that I've been taught by taxistas:

Good day - maaah-lo keen' (2 word phrase: malo kin - malo in Mayan means good, the opposite of malo in Spanish, and is pronounced as a drawn-out maaah-lo (as in ahhh - not baaah like a sheep) with the long 'o' softly and suddenly cut off at the end, as in 'oat' but without the 't' sound - start by saying 'oat' and lose the 't' somewhere in the back of your throat)

What's happening, how goes it, what's up, how are you doing, que pasa, etc - (2 word phrase: baasch-ka wah-leet? (basca walit)

The answer is maaah-lo' (one word) with the cut-off long 'o' at the end, meaning good, well, but most commonly mish-bah (sounds like mish in mish-mash), meaning OK, not bad, the usual, good enough, mas-o-menos, etc.

Where are you going? 2 word phrase Toosh ka-bean?

I/we are going to eat - 2 word phrase koh-osh hahn-nah' (both 'Os' pronounced with the long 'O' in English as in 'go' - spelled Koox, roughly 'let's go')

beans - bool, the double 'oo' sounds like 'moo' (e.g., going to eat beans: koh-osh han-nah bool) [pollo pibil, cochinita pibil, etc.]. Unfortunately, I don't know how to say we're going to drink beer, and eating beer sounds more than a little odd - but you never know - you might try saying 'ko-osh han-nah cervesa' and see what it gets you (read the label closely).

water - hah - I'm told by the Chiapas taxistas that 'ha' (water) is the only word universally understood among all the dialects of Maya (of which I'm told there are apparently 12-13, maybe more, in Chiapas, mutually unintelligible among themselves and different from Yucatecan Maya).

Thank you (formal, as in thanks be to god): 2 word phrase dee-osh po-teek with the first word 'dios' pronounced as dee-osh. Usually spoken quickly so that it sounds like 'dee-osh boutique', both 'Os' are long 'O' (not boo-tique) [just as the french wine sounds like bo-jolay, not boo-jolay - but different circumstances, etc.] There's a less formal 2-word phrase for thank you that I can't remember, but it sounds something like 'neep oh-lah' - you might try it and hope for a correction, or at least a glimmer of recognition, but the formal invocation of the divinity in 'deeosh poteek' has a lot more gravitas behind it...

overcast sky - 2 word phrase: no coal (sounds like 'no coal' in English)

rain - one word cha-ahk - although there's another chaak (no break between the cha and ak) that means red, as in chaak mool, the sacrificial stone where the heart is ripped out, etc - or maybe I have it backwards - you will probably not need to know the difference, unless....

Done, finished, completed, is that all/everything, finito, etc - shoopy, most commonly the 2 word phrase shoopy tel-lahkah - as a question when exiting a taxi after collecting all your stuff from the front, back and trunk/boot, paying your bill, (hotel or restaurant), etc., ( shoopy?, to which the reply will be shoopy telaka (it's done done).

Goodbye, later, see you tomorrow, manana, etc: sama, pronounced saaah-mah (or more fully the 2 word phrase 'tacks saaahmah'). [It's from 'zama', the original name in Yucateca Maya for Tulum, which as the farthest east Mayan temple was the first to receive the new day's (i.e., tomorrow's) sunlight.]

All I can think of at the moment...hope it gets you and Miss Avril at least an E for effort in the heart of Mayan Mexico desconocido (better yet a free beer or two). Safe journey!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #42 (permalink)
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Viva Mexico

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryD View Post
Morelos can be a contrast of things, the very poor from villages outside of town and the more well to do from the town.

Food ranges from the basic 5 to 10 peso item.





To fairly fancy places like this coffee shop.









The sign reminding you to wash up before you eat...good advice if you don't want to get sick. So much food in Mexico is eaten with your hands.











But nothing is too expensive. Not like I see in PDC or any of the tourist areas I have visited around the coastal areas, the gulf of Mexico and Pacific coast included. Once the tourist sharks move into a place, you end up having to hunt around to avoid the tourist prices. You will pretty much have to know some Spanish to get by though... not much if any English spoken around there and I don't even try to speak English back in the local areas. Some people even speak Maya words mixed with Spanish to make it more interesting/challenging.

Just might buy that casita yet.
For that price you should!
I have experienced some in Mexico too!I have driven from Vancouver to Los Cabos 10 times........I just got back last week from there.I had not been there for 20 years since we sold our casita.....OMG,has it changed!I hated what it has become & never will go back!
I am going back to Playa del Carmen next month & I have a feeling it will be the same.......but nicer beach.My girlfriend is in Zihuat right now & says its the real Mexico,so that maybe my next trip next winter. I do speak some Spanish,can read most of it too...learned it driving the Baja.
I am travelling alone now as I lost my hubby last year..so many of my friends are so afraid of Mexico & I can understand that but then Surrey can be scary today too!
In Cabo, a week before I got there.....there was 6 bodies hanging from the bridge outside my hotel!
Keep up the good work,I really enjoy it.....muchas gracias.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #43 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beam-eye View Post
Here are a few words/phrases in Yucatecan Maya that I've been taught by taxistas:

Good day - maaah-lo keen' (2 word phrase: malo kin - malo in Mayan means good, the opposite of malo in Spanish, and is pronounced as a drawn-out maaah-lo (as in ahhh - not baaah like a sheep) with the long 'o' softly and suddenly cut off at the end, as in 'oat' but without the 't' sound - start by saying 'oat' and lose the 't' somewhere in the back of your throat)

What's happening, how goes it, what's up, how are you doing, que pasa, etc - (2 word phrase: baasch-ka wah-leet? (basca walit)

The answer is maaah-lo' (one word) with the cut-off long 'o' at the end, meaning good, well, but most commonly mish-bah (sounds like mish in mish-mash), meaning OK, not bad, the usual, good enough, mas-o-menos, etc.

Where are you going? 2 word phrase Toosh ka-bean?

I/we are going to eat - 2 word phrase koh-osh hahn-nah' (both 'Os' pronounced with the long 'O' in English as in 'go' - spelled Koox, roughly 'let's go')

beans - bool, the double 'oo' sounds like 'moo' (e.g., going to eat beans: koh-osh han-nah bool) [pollo pibil, cochinita pibil, etc.]. Unfortunately, I don't know how to say we're going to drink beer, and eating beer sounds more than a little odd - but you never know - you might try saying 'ko-osh han-nah cervesa' and see what it gets you (read the label closely).

water - hah - I'm told by the Chiapas taxistas that 'ha' (water) is the only word universally understood among all the dialects of Maya (of which I'm told there are apparently 12-13, maybe more, in Chiapas, mutually unintelligible among themselves and different from Yucatecan Maya).

Thank you (formal, as in thanks be to god): 2 word phrase dee-osh po-teek with the first word 'dios' pronounced as dee-osh. Usually spoken quickly so that it sounds like 'dee-osh boutique', both 'Os' are long 'O' (not boo-tique) [just as the french wine sounds like bo-jolay, not boo-jolay - but different circumstances, etc.] There's a less formal 2-word phrase for thank you that I can't remember, but it sounds something like 'neep oh-lah' - you might try it and hope for a correction, or at least a glimmer of recognition, but the formal invocation of the divinity in 'deeosh poteek' has a lot more gravitas behind it...

overcast sky - 2 word phrase: no coal (sounds like 'no coal' in English)

rain - one word cha-ahk - although there's another chaak (no break between the cha and ak) that means red, as in chaak mool, the sacrificial stone where the heart is ripped out, etc - or maybe I have it backwards - you will probably not need to know the difference, unless....

Done, finished, completed, is that all/everything, finito, etc - shoopy, most commonly the 2 word phrase shoopy tel-lahkah - as a question when exiting a taxi after collecting all your stuff from the front, back and trunk/boot, paying your bill, (hotel or restaurant), etc., ( shoopy?, to which the reply will be shoopy telaka (it's done done).

Goodbye, later, see you tomorrow, manana, etc: sama, pronounced saaah-mah (or more fully the 2 word phrase 'tacks saaahmah'). [It's from 'zama', the original name in Yucateca Maya for Tulum, which as the farthest east Mayan temple was the first to receive the new day's (i.e., tomorrow's) sunlight.]

All I can think of at the moment...hope it gets you and Miss Avril at least an E for effort in the heart of Mayan Mexico desconocido (better yet a free beer or two). Safe journey!
Thanks beam-eye! I will study them, I can see using some of those for sure. The trick is remembering them at the time. Dee osh po teek!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #44 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by dibiggs View Post
For that price you should!
I have experienced some in Mexico too!I have driven from Vancouver to Los Cabos 10 times........I just got back last week from there.I had not been there for 20 years since we sold our casita.....OMG,has it changed!I hated what it has become & never will go back!
I am going back to Playa del Carmen next month & I have a feeling it will be the same.......but nicer beach.My girlfriend is in Zihuat right now & says its the real Mexico,so that maybe my next trip next winter. I do speak some Spanish,can read most of it too...learned it driving the Baja.
I am travelling alone now as I lost my hubby last year..so many of my friends are so afraid of Mexico & I can understand that but then Surrey can be scary today too!
In Cabo, a week before I got there.....there was 6 bodies hanging from the bridge outside my hotel!
Keep up the good work,I really enjoy it.....muchas gracias.
The "real" Mexico can be hard to find if you are around the tourist zones, be they Canadian/American tourists or Mexican ones. Generally I just go to where no one speaks English and I'm sure I have seen the way the locals really live more than a few times. A larger city like Tuxtla can be... and is quite interesting and full of culture and not much in the western way.

I'm sorry to hear about your husband. Abril lost hers 2 and a half years ago, and started hanging out with me last year. Hopefully you will find a travel partner too.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #45 (permalink)
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Isla Aguada

SOooo leaving Sabancuy and the monkey behind, the following morning we moved down the coast to Isla Aguada.
There it sits at the eastern entrance to Laguna de Terminos, a massive coastal lagoon with part of the town bordering on the gulf of Mexico and the fishing and now tourist fleet on the sheltered side.







After doing without hot water the previous night we elected to stay at a somewhat more upscale place. Something that can be afforded time to time since Miss Abril pays half.

Hotel Iguana's Cabana. The circle room.








This pool would be perfect to chill your beer in though... ice cold.

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