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EditedUser 01-05-2017 04:38 PM

Solicitation for Employed Relocation with Work Visa
 
Hi,

The purpose of this post is to ask some questions.

I am looking for any suggestions or leads for employment in Playa Del Carmen or telecommuting that can be done from Playa Del Carmen.

I really like the area, and I am finishing upgrading a degree, and would like to relocate there on a work visa, ideally.

I know some Spanish, but I am not yet fluent. I am very familiar with PDC as I have vacationed there about 5 times for about a month each time. My last trip I was there for a couple months.

More info on me

http://artsweb.uwaterloo.ca/~washley


The purpose of this account is to seek solicitations for means of legal relocation to Playa Del Carmen.

I am heavily considering taking a trip there in April even if I don't have work, but ideally I would like to relocate when my exams finish in April, with work in place as it is better to have fuel than be burning it.

Susie Q Roo 01-05-2017 11:23 PM

Do you have some idea of what you might do here, in terms of employment? Do you bring something that cannot be found from the local citizen pool of potential employees? I believe you have to become fluent in Spanish first, and then be here in person to look for employment. However, I think you'd do much better to check the usual routes to find a telecommuting position.

EditedUser 01-06-2017 12:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Susie Q Roo (Post 2164546)
Do you have some idea of what you might do here, in terms of employment?

Lol


Solicitation for Employed Relocation with Work Visa
Hi,

The purpose of this post is to ask some questions.

I am looking for any suggestions or leads for employment in Playa Del Carmen or telecommuting that can be done from Playa Del Carmen. :)


Quote:

Do you bring something that cannot be found from the local citizen pool of potential employees?
Certainly. I am a native English speaker with a university education, a technical and field specific background. I am not to say what the work pool is like right now in Q. Roo, as I am not in human resources or business management. I am also a trained communicator.

Check out the link I supplied for some of my background. I am a History major with minors in Anthropology, Applied Language Studies, and Legal Studies.

I have work employment as a student residence manager, and I am currently a bouncer at some nightclubs/bars. I have experience with corporate management of a radio station and I've volunteered and worked in teaching English as a Second Language. My background of studies is generally cultural studies, with knowledge of cultural resource management, archaeology, and multimedia.

Bear in mind there are plenty of people in Mexico with a knowledge of Mesoamerican indigenous and colonial history, it is Mexico. I'd be very interested in doing something related to cultural sites, perhaps related to tourism. Now there are a lot of people working in tourism and cultural stuff in Q. Roo, however perhaps there would be a use for a Native English speaker who is an Anglo from Canada. I have a working knowledge of French and Spanish. I've done 3 Immersion programs and taken a couple courses in French in University, I've taken 3 Spanish courses in University and one in highschool. This term I am suppose to complete all spanish grammar structures. Arguably I might deem myself intermediate. I can read Spanish ok, and can probably write Spanish as well as many Mexicans. I have a long way to go, and I have 3 more months of Spanish this term before finishing my current 201B Spanish course (I didn't take Spanish 101 as they had me take 102 because I already had knowledge of Spanish from my trips to Mexico. However based upon the general 5000 hours of use of Spanish I think it will be a long time until I gain fluency. None the less I've been able to stay in Mexico for months just fine, and I am fully functional as an extranjero/pesudo-gringo.

The jobs I have been offered in Mexico have been things like teaching English, call centers and time share services in as an Airport employee. I've seen others do internships in hotels/hostels, and real estate, etc..

I'd really like to do something in cultural resource management even if it doesn't pay very well as I'd like to eventually continue studies in CRM, such as building conservation. I'd also really like a chance to work with the Maya using traditional methods such as traditional Mexican small scale agriculture, indigenous construction using native materials etc...

Bear in mind I really have nothing set in mind with what I can do, I just want to give a run at relocating to Playa Del Carmen because it is the place my soul feels most energized, it is the place that keeps bringing me back. I feel at peace there, even though some of the most destructive moments of my life have occurred there.





Quote:

I believe you have to become fluent in Spanish first, and then be here in person to look for employment.
Why do you say that? Although I would agree many employeers do want to meet people prior, it is actually way more complex because work visas can only be obtained from a consulate in the country of origin. How it works is that oftne a work clearance permit has to be gained first and then that is used for a work visa. It is fairly easy to get illegal work in Mexico, which can be done if you know the right people. However, I ain't interested in illegal work as I like Mexico too much to screw up migra relations.



Quote:

However, I think you'd do much better to check the usual routes to find a telecommuting position.
I will likely check the Spanish classified sites they usually are the best for finding work in Mexico, as opposed to the English sites.



I am suppose to finish Imagina this term, we've worked through about half of it. I read and listen to Spanish news regularly. None the less I hope to be a firm intermediate by the end of term, I doubt I will be fluent by the end of the decade.

http://vistahigherlearning.com/educa...d-edition.html




My main time sink is working on a website for my studies at http://heritageconservation.info its not a money thing though just a hobby. Its only up when I have it up right now as it is more of a study tool for me than a publication.



I could see myself doing importing too as I can usually find good prices on Chinese goods.


I'm suppose to do some heavy reading on Environmental History this term, and that likely will add to some of the knowledge I already have.

I am a big person on ancient history, primitive crafts and skills etc..

I have a little background in Security, I am security licensed. I drive motorcycle and Car. I would love to drive truck.

I am a keen learning always willing to learn new skills.
I have some training in electrical engineering technology/electronics and I am certified to build radios in Canada.

I am computer literate, I can host my own server, make websites, wordpress, social media knowledgeable.

I am a trained model.

I have no idea if there are any skills shortages.

Is there even a shortage of workers in anything in Playa?

No idea if or what is needed in playa.

I am also a trained private investigator, with knowledge of skip tracing and various clandestine skillsets.

Always willing to learn new skills.

I'd love to be an assistant/driver/personal aid to a wealthy family or person etc.. too. I am keen on increasing my knowledge of private security.

Very green though nothing at all expected. I am just someone who is willing and ready to make a run at relocating if an opportunity presents itself. I like the area I want to be there, so I have to make the attempt.


Often I am somehow involved with event planning.


None the less 0 expectation. I am not here to take a Mexican's job, I am hopeful to improve the function of Mexico so that it creates more bounty for Mexico which in turn will improve the quality of life for people in general, thereby adding to Mexico, and enhancing the nationals of Mexico.

I would compare it to someone having access to a pirated song (a crime in Mexico), where some poor chap might not even listen to it if they had to pay. I see what I am offering much the same, I really hope to be somewhere that I will add something people wouldn't be able to experience without me, I hope to provide people with something they wouldn't otherwise have, not to cheat someone out of their livelihood. I want everyone to be productive, I don't want to bring in jealously or hate. You know that is the job of the Migra or whomever approves work permits and visas to make those decisions. I am here to make myself available, its up to the business and government to decide if I will be beneficial to the state and the people.



You know Mexico may be on the verge of some really BIG changes when Trump assumes office. I assume if the boat is going to get rocked then having people willing to try to help keep Mexico floating, competitive etc.. are all good things. You know maybe nothing will happen but there are lots of instances where Mexicans may benefit from having assistants with native English backgrounds to understand what is going on, how tourism may be effected by a backlash against mexicans, flight of latino US workers and closing of illegal immigration conduits, a collapse of NAFTA, tit for tat etc... I see myself as a resource.

In my view Mexcio can benefit from good relations with Gringos and other Anglo Extranjeros. You know with Brexit a collapse of the EU and Russian sanctioning there is a lot of economic uncertanty, that could unfold, especially with the possible global effects of US protectionism. You know I think they can benefits from allies and followers, you know I am just one of those people. I like the area I want to see it succeed. If Mexicans are demonized in the looming trade war, than having non Mexican nationals that are fluent English speakers may be useful aides for Mexican businesses, especially if people look down on Mexican accented Mexican's trying to do business with them. I am not saying it would happen but you know I think there might be a big shake up looming between Mexico and the US.

EditedUser 01-06-2017 12:40 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tbwLQCw43Q

Wow like this is what you would expect in Venezuela not Mexico...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGl26lK68xw


oil remains down

DrewJones 01-06-2017 11:08 AM

Sorry to sound pessimistic, but simply finding an employer in Playa del Carmen willing to sponsor you for a work visa are almost 0. In the big cities of Mexico, you odds would be about 5% if your Spanish is advanced.


One option is MONEY. Either a qualified pension, or a lump sum investment.


If those don't apply to you, then your next best option is just come down here, get black out drunk on 12th calle, fall in love with a local party girl, then 9 months later you can get meet you wonderful little work visa at the Hospital General (corner of Av 135 and Constituyentes).


If you aren't willing to mess up your life like that, then come down here for a 6 month visit and NETWORK NETWORK NETWORK. If you're open to other cities (Cancun, Merida, Mexico City) your options will expand. If you think your skills at importing goods from China will help, then you'll want to meet someone who does that and work along side. (Tepito in Mexico City would be the best place for this option) However, with Chinese importing, keep in mind there are people that have been dealing with black market and knock off item trade for decades, and unless you're really good, this would be a difficult industry to break in to.


A simpler option if you have some money to live, would be to do language exchange. You shouldn't have any legal problems trading an hour of English for Spanish. After you get established doing that you can find some people to teach for cash (probably 50 to 100 pesos and hour). You'd then be breaking the law, but if you're VERY informal it should be no problem.


The other "technically illegal" thing you can do once you know the right people is simply referrals for accommodation and tours. If you bring me a client to stay in my rental units, I'll happily pay you 10% and I won't ask any questions about your immigration status. I charge $250 USD a week, I give you 500 pesos. Plenty of landlords in town will do this.


Dive Shops! Get certified as a Dive Instructor. I think that's one of the few industries out here that would actually do the visa paperwork for you. I could be completely wrong though. I do have a British friend who taught in Thailand and Cambodia for a decade. He was legally working the entire time. Not sure about here though...

EditedUser 01-06-2017 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrewJones (Post 2164584)
Sorry to sound pessimistic, but simply finding an employer in Playa del Carmen willing to sponsor you for a work visa are almost 0. In the big cities of Mexico, you odds would be about 5% if your Spanish is advanced.

That is pretty low, I've been offered jobs in places like Mexico City, but I am not really interested in working in a non-coastal location.


Quote:

One option is MONEY. Either a qualified pension, or a lump sum investment.
Nah, I'm not really a pension age person, I'm still pretty young.

Quote:

If those don't apply to you, then your next best option is just come down here, get black out drunk on 12th calle, fall in love with a local party girl, then 9 months later you can get meet you wonderful little work visa at the Hospital General (corner of Av 135 and Constituyentes).
lol, if I got your meaning correct, I would never aim to bring a child into this world without having their future secured.



Quote:

If you aren't willing to mess up your life like that, then come down here for a 6 month visit and NETWORK NETWORK NETWORK. If you're open to other cities (Cancun, Merida, Mexico City) your options will expand. If you think your skills at importing goods from China will help, then you'll want to meet someone who does that and work along side. (Tepito in Mexico City would be the best place for this option) However, with Chinese importing, keep in mind there are people that have been dealing with black market and knock off item trade for decades, and unless you're really good, this would be a difficult industry to break in to.
I am pretty confident I could find work in DF, however, I am not really interested in working in DF. I would do contract work there but I don't really want to relocate there.


Quote:

A simpler option if you have some money to live, would be to do language exchange. You shouldn't have any legal problems trading an hour of English for Spanish. After you get established doing that you can find some people to teach for cash (probably 50 to 100 pesos and hour). You'd then be breaking the law, but if you're VERY informal it should be no problem.
I'm not willing to break any Mexican laws.



Quote:

The other "technically illegal" thing you can do once you know the right people is simply referrals for accommodation and tours. If you bring me a client to stay in my rental units, I'll happily pay you 10% and I won't ask any questions about your immigration status. I charge $250 USD a week, I give you 500 pesos. Plenty of landlords in town will do this.
I'd consider something like that, something related to a tourist agent but having more local knowledge. I would consider doing my TICO etc.. however, I'd rather not go into business for myself while in Mexcio because it may also require a separate visa for business activities while in Mexico. I wouldn't rule something tourism related out; however, I'd need to look into it more. There are, at times, people looking for rental, however, you'd need a lot of inputs to really make money. I could see how it might work but again, legally I think I would need a remuneration business type visa if I was acting as a middle man on other peoples properties for profit.


Quote:

Dive Shops! Get certified as a Dive Instructor. I think that's one of the few industries out here that would actually do the visa paperwork for you. I could be completely wrong though. I do have a British friend who taught in Thailand and Cambodia for a decade. He was legally working the entire time. Not sure about here though...
Is there really a demand for dive instructors, or green dive instructors. I do have my rescue diver, eanx, deep, again I would do this if I had a job waiting for me on the other end but it would eat into my funding if I certified and didn't have a job from it. The other problem is that I eat up air pretty fast because I have a big body and high respiration rate. None the less, I would do something like that but is there really a demand? I would figure the dive shops would have tons of staff available for that even with limits on dive times.




I am open to language exchanges, however, I think I'd be more likely to do studies in an educational program, but that usually requires like a 6 month admissions lead time, than do a paid exchange. I don't know as an applied language studies student, and TEFL/TESOL certified person, with years of Spanish, French, and Latin language learning I feel sort of confident in my ability to teach myself wherever I am. Paying to learn a non-credit/degree language is problematic for return on investment. My resources are limited and language courses can be costly. Are there any in PDC? I've seen many others elsewhere but don't recall seeing any exchanges in PDC.

If I was putting out money I might try a college/university program if I could a Master's in anthropology,archaeology or conservation/preservation sciences, tourism related, or a redseal type trade such as building on my communications or electrical training, or infrastructure/scada related. As I hear Playa will likely need infrastructure upgrades, or a distributed system if it takes on green energy. It would need people who know those systems. I suspect eventually things like water/sewage, and electrical will be upgraded so there could be a future in it.




I think that it would take time to develope a working real estate business, but I think this is probably the best bet for someone with time, however the amount of clients is really the, question.
Every time I come down now I am often looking for a place, and I chat with people I meet, I have hosteled quite a bit. So I understand there is often a language barrier between owners and who would be their renters. I won't go deep into it or how the system works here, but yes, I think owners and their agents would be happy to see their properties move with good clients, and renters would be happy to find a place. You know the signs are in spanish so anglos don't really understand, they feel put off in calling someone who speaks Spanish and only bad English, they can't communicate with them.


None the less it may be improving. Again though getting a visa to provide this service may be difficult, and I think it would be needed if money is changing hands.

To be honest though, sales is big always commission in sales, but I have never been much a sales person. I like providing services, personally.

Babaloo 01-06-2017 11:30 PM

Sometimes less is more.

EditedUser 01-07-2017 11:46 PM

I am all for the KISS methodology.

Clarity of communications is important too though. Misunderstanding can add complexity as opposed to reducing it.

beerbreath 01-12-2017 12:23 PM

If you want to live and work in Playa the best situation is to have a internet based business.You will get paid more and you don't have to worry about any paperwork.

u2girlie 01-12-2017 01:24 PM

OK, Iīm sorry but I couldnīt read your entire posts. I was getting glossy eyed.

Here are the facts as I have experienced them (I live here and have my residente temporal con permiso para trabajar):

When thinking types of jobs, think service industry. Jobs here are 99.9% tourism. Tour guides, Snorkel guides, bartenders, waiters, timeshare, etc.

You can get a job with permission to work but it is extremely difficult, a long process, and once you finally get your permission set up, itīs like you landed the golden goose.

You can not apply for a freelance work permit. Prior to 2012 you could. They changed the laws and as of November 2012, you can no longer freelance (at least no new freelancers). You have to either have a job offer or open your own business & then go through the process of having your business approved to hire foreigners so you can hire yourself. From starting the process of creating a business to where you might be approved by immigration is a minimum of 6 months and you need $50,000 pesos of investment money + lawyers fees, fees to immigraiton, fees for permits, the list goes on and on. But definitely doable just time consuming and costly.

In Playa del Carmen/Quintana Roo, I would be VERY surprised if you secured a job offer without being here. You have to come here and interview. Remember, there are 1,000s of people who come here to live and work. The job market is saturated with both nationals (much easier to hire) and foreigners (many with multiple language skills - highly desirable). Plus, you will be contending with many foreigners who are willing to work illegally in exchange for living in ĻparadiseĻ.

Not all companies have permission to hire foreigners. This is a separate process that business need to apply for through INM. Smaller businesses (like dive shops), may not have gone through the process so therefore can not legally hire you.

Speaking of dive shops, assuming they have been approved by immigration to hire foreigners, they will not offers you a job offer/path to legalization. That is unless you have a friend who owns a dive shop and is willing to do it. Way too many young dive instructors willing to work illegally.

If you want a job in Playa del Carmen, this is what normally happens:
1) Come in on a tourist visa.
2) Interview/Network (as DrewJones told you)
3) Get a job with an offer. They will expect you to start working even if you donīt have your temporary residency with permission to work yet. That means you will be working illegally until they process your paperwork. This means, of course, you are at risk of deportation if immigration visits your workplace (including doing checks in dive shops, waiting at locations where tours take place to check the immigration status of tour guides, etc.).
4) If you get through that process, and your company ACTUALLY follows through with submitting your paperwork (believe me, many tell you what you want to hear but they never follow through), you will have to leave the country to visit a Mexican consulate (ex: go to Miami) and conduct the interview, then return and finalize everything with immigration here.

From the point of a job offer to actually having your temporary residency with permission to work can take months and months. I know someone who was working and waiting for the process for over a year - every day he was worried he would get caught. It was extremely stressful for him (he worked in a restaurant on 5th where immigration frequently likes to make spot inspections).

You will not waltz into Playa with permission to work in hand. If that does happen, you are one of the only people I have heard of to do that.

If you apply for permanent residency and can prove meet the financial requirements of such residency, thatīs a whole other ball game. You can work with permanent. However, you have to start that process outside of Mexico at a Mexican consulate.

Sorry, I just realized how long winded this is. Itīs just not a simple process, at all.

u2girlie 01-12-2017 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrewJones (Post 2164584)


Dive Shops! Get certified as a Dive Instructor. I think that's one of the few industries out here that would actually do the visa paperwork for you. I could be completely wrong though. I do have a British friend who taught in Thailand and Cambodia for a decade. He was legally working the entire time. Not sure about here though...

Nope. I have quite a few friends in the dive industry here and getting a work visa here (post 2012 changes in immigration law) is nearly impossible unless you are friends with the shop owner & theyīre willing to help you out. The market is saturated with young instructors willing to work illegally.

Dan-0 01-12-2017 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beerbreath (Post 2165423)
If you want to live and work in Playa the best situation is to have a internet based business.You will get paid more and you don't have to worry about any paperwork.

Badbreath is right (for once :)). Not only would working online let you skip the bureaucratic work permission process u2girlie so articulately described, online work would allow you to be paid in your home currency instead of pesos- which, judging by the way things are right now, would be highly desirable.

u2girlie 01-12-2017 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan-0 (Post 2165444)
Badbreath is right (for once :)). Not only would working online let you skip the bureaucratic work permission process u2girlie so articulately described, online work would allow you to be paid in your home currency instead of pesos- which, judging by the way things are right now, would be highly desirable.

Agree. I am paid in pesos (of course) and when I traveled back to the U.S. for Christmas, I had sticker shock. At Logan airport in Boston, I changed my $2,070 pesos for about $78 USD. I just about passed out. $2,000 is pretty big chunk of change for me. I will not be traveling back to the U.S. this year or next year, if I can help it.

EditedUser 01-12-2017 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by u2girlie (Post 2165428)
Jobs here are 99.9% tourism. Tour guides, Snorkel guides, bartenders, waiters, timeshare, etc.

I've been in Playa for quite a few months in total, my last trip there was for about 3 months. I've been in various areas from Playacar to near the industrial wing and military base, to xcaret etc.. to the beach fronts - cozumel cancun all the major mayan sites, the capital chetumal etc.. I've seen a bit more than what the average tourist may have seen.



Quote:

You can get a job with permission to work but it is extremely difficult, a long process, and once you finally get your permission set up, itīs like you landed the golden goose.
Yes I have found people are really willing to give illegal work in various sectors of the economy but getting things done officially is more problematic they just want you to show up and do the job, not go through the problems (and costs) of getting permission to hire a foreigner.




Quote:

You can not apply for a freelance work permit. Prior to 2012 you could. They changed the laws and as of November 2012, you can no longer freelance (at least no new freelancers). You have to either have a job offer or open your own business & then go through the process of having your business approved to hire foreigners so you can hire yourself. From starting the process of creating a business to where you might be approved by immigration is a minimum of 6 months and you need $50,000 pesos of investment money + lawyers fees, fees to immigraiton, fees for permits, the list goes on and on. But definitely doable just time consuming and costly.
I am not totally sure on everything on that but your advice on this is welcome, although, I am more or less seeking being retained by someone or an organization as opposed to opening a business or being oppourtunist. The whole idea is to probe prior to the vacation after my degree upgrade is finished to take a break from studies and see if there is any life in Mexico for me beyond periodic trips.


Quote:

In Playa del Carmen/Quintana Roo, I would be VERY surprised if you secured a job offer without being here. You have to come here and interview. Remember, there are 1,000s of people who come here to live and work. The job market is saturated with both nationals (much easier to hire) and foreigners (many with multiple language skills - highly desirable). Plus, you will be contending with many foreigners who are willing to work illegally in exchange for living in ĻparadiseĻ.
This is what I have found also, it is sort of standard however, some employers have been willing to do electronic interviews over things like skype forgoing an in person interview, I haven't tried this in quite a few years though. I do have some offers to teach online though that I would consider taking up, I am not sure of how international teaching works via telecommuting, for example teaching people in China. Is that working in Mexico if I do my own business activities that relate to interactions with China. I am not sure how this is really considered by Mexcio in terms of labour laws, employment, especially if no money is being transfered to any mexican accounts and I am not being paid by anyone in Mexico.


Quote:

Not all companies have permission to hire foreigners. This is a separate process that business need to apply for through INM. Smaller businesses (like dive shops), may not have gone through the process so therefore can not legally hire you.
Yes I have insisted on the work permit for the purpose of visa and that has been a deal killer in some cases because for whatever reason they don't want to get it or can't.



Quote:

Speaking of dive shops, assuming they have been approved by immigration to hire foreigners, they will not offers you a job offer/path to legalization. That is unless you have a friend who owns a dive shop and is willing to do it. Way too many young dive instructors willing to work illegally.
I don't know, I do know I've met quite a bit of people with their dive master certs who have said they were offered or have work in a dive shop. I don't know if they had a permit and all that, I didn't really ask but there do seem to be quite a few people working in or with dive shops in Mexcio in places like Playa and other tourist areas, although there are Mexicans working in them or as owners too.


Quote:

If you want a job in Playa del Carmen, this is what normally happens:
1) Come in on a tourist visa.
2) Interview/Network (as DrewJones told you)
3) Get a job with an offer. They will expect you to start working even if you donīt have your temporary residency with permission to work yet. That means you will be working illegally until they process your paperwork. This means, of course, you are at risk of deportation if immigration visits your workplace (including doing checks in dive shops, waiting at locations where tours take place to check the immigration status of tour guides, etc.).
4) If you get through that process, and your company ACTUALLY follows through with submitting your paperwork (believe me, many tell you what you want to hear but they never follow through), you will have to leave the country to visit a Mexican consulate (ex: go to Miami) and conduct the interview, then return and finalize everything with immigration here.

From the point of a job offer to actually having your temporary residency with permission to work can take months and months. I know someone who was working and waiting for the process for over a year - every day he was worried he would get caught. It was extremely stressful for him (he worked in a restaurant on 5th where immigration frequently likes to make spot inspections).

You will not waltz into Playa with permission to work in hand. If that does happen, you are one of the only people I have heard of to do that.

If you apply for permanent residency and can prove meet the financial requirements of such residency, thatīs a whole other ball game. You can work with permanent. However, you have to start that process outside of Mexico at a Mexican consulate.

Sorry, I just realized how long winded this is. Itīs just not a simple process, at all.
Oh, yes all the legal barriers, the interview, the permit, the visa application, there can be time and cost additions too. This all at a time of pretty rocky economic times in Mexico filled with lots of uncertainty... really low peso values and all that. You would think that would attract more tourism due to favourable exchange rates. It will be interesting to see what happens.



I am definately not a resident in Mexico just when I can an annual traveler normally for up to a Month. The last time I was there was a little longer, about 3 months as I got food poisoning missed my flight and had to wait to rebook, and I've lost over $10,000 on the beach at Mamamita's Beach Club due to a beach thief, and I have come very close to doing FM3 work for an extended time, I've also trained in Mexico to teach English, however no, I am not a resident, I do feel at home there though.

EditedUser 01-12-2017 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan-0 (Post 2165444)
Badbreath is right (for once :)). Not only would working online let you skip the bureaucratic work permission process u2girlie so articulately described, online work would allow you to be paid in your home currency instead of pesos- which, judging by the way things are right now, would be highly desirable.

Yes telecommuting does have advantages, I am not totally certain on how it is viewed legally if performing work functions while in Mexico. Do you have more info on that?

I have been looking at that option as based upon my days hosteling I would need to work about an hour a day to survive in Mexico based upon standard wages for things like teaching online.

Not really sure what telecommuting is out there fully.

Do you have any specific examples of sorts of telecommuting people do while staying in Playa?


You would still only be able to stay for 6 months a year in that structure though, no?


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